Sense and Sensibility  理智与情感

"That is true," cried Marianne, in a cheerful voice, and walking to thewindow as she spoke, to examine the day. "I had not thought of that.This weather will keep many sportsmen in the country."

  “确实是这样,”玛丽安带着快活的语气说道,一边朝窗口走去,察看一下天气。“我还没想到这一点呢。遇到这样的天气,好多游猎家都要呆在乡下不走的。”

It was a lucky recollection, all her good spirits were restored by it."It is charming weather for THEM indeed," she continued, as she satdown to the breakfast table with a happy countenance. "How much theymust enjoy it! But" (with a little return of anxiety) "it cannot beexpected to last long. At this time of the year, and after such aseries of rain, we shall certainly have very little more of it. Frostswill soon set in, and in all probability with severity. In another dayor two perhaps; this extreme mildness can hardly last longer--nay,perhaps it may freeze tonight!"

  幸亏这一番回忆,她重新变得兴高采烈起来。“这天气对他们确实富有魅力,”她接着说道,一面带着快活的神气,在饭桌前坐好。“他们有多开心啊!不过,”(她的忧虑又有些回复)“这是不可能持久的。碰上这个时节,又一连下了好几场雨,当然不会再接着下了。霜冻马上就要开始,十有八九还很厉害,也许就在这一两天。这种极端温和的天气怕是持续不下去了——晤,说不定今天夜里就要上冻!”

"At any rate," said Elinor, wishing to prevent Mrs. Jennings fromseeing her sister's thoughts as clearly as she did, "I dare say weshall have Sir John and Lady Middleton in town by the end of next week."

  玛丽安在想什么,埃丽诺了解得一清二楚,她不想让詹宁斯太太看透妹妹的心事,于是说道:“无论如何,到下周末机心庄子用语。指机变之心。《庄子-天地》:“有机械者,我们肯定能把约翰爵士和米德尔顿夫人迎到城里。”

"Ay, my dear, I'll warrant you we do. Mary always has her own way."

  “啊,亲爱的,我敢担保没问题。玛丽安总要别人听她的。”

"And now," silently conjectured Elinor, "she will write to Combe bythis day's post."

  “瞧吧,”埃丽诺心里猜想,“她要往库姆写信啦,赶在今天发走。

But if she DID, the letter was written and sent away with a privacywhich eluded all her watchfulness to ascertain the fact. Whatever thetruth of it might be, and far as Elinor was from feeling thoroughcontentment about it, yet while she saw Marianne in spirits, she couldnot be very uncomfortable herself. And Marianne was in spirits; happyin the mildness of the weather, and still happier in her expectation ofa frost.

  “但是,即使玛丽安真的这样做了。那也是秘密写好,秘密发走的,埃丽诺元论怎么留神观察,还是没有发现真情。无论事实真相加何本原因,找到解决人与文明之间冲突的途径。,尽管埃丽诺对此远非十分满意,然而一见到玛丽安兴高采烈,她自己也不能太别别扭扭的。玛丽安确实兴高采烈,她为温和的天气感到高兴,更为霜冻即将来临感到高兴。

The morning was chiefly spent in leaving cards at the houses of Mrs.Jennings's acquaintance to inform them of her being in town; andMarianne was all the time busy in observing the direction of the wind,watching the variations of the sky and imagining an alteration in theair.

  这天上午,主要用来给詹宁斯太太的熟人家里送送名片,告诉他们太太已经回城。玛丽安始终在观察风向,注视着天空的种种变异,设想着就要变天。

"Don't you find it colder than it was in the morning, Elinor? Thereseems to me a very decided difference. I can hardly keep my hands warmeven in my muff. It was not so yesterday, I think. The clouds seemparting too, the sun will be out in a moment, and we shall have a clearafternoon."

  “埃丽诺,你难道不觉得天气比早晨冷吗?我似乎觉得大不一样。我甚至戴着皮手筒,都不能把手暖和过来。我想昨天并不是这样。云彩也在散开,太阳一会儿就要出来,下午准是个晴天。”

Elinor was alternately diverted and pained; but Marianne persevered,and saw every night in the brightness of the fire, and every morning inthe appearance of the atmosphere, the certain symptoms of approachingfrost.

  埃丽诺心里时喜时悲,倒是玛丽安能够始终如一,她每天晚上见到通明的炉火,每天早晨看到天象,都认定是霜冻即将来临的确凿征兆。

The Miss Dashwoods had no greater reason to be dissatisfied with Mrs.Jennings's style of living, and set of acquaintance, than with herbehaviour to themselves, which was invariably kind. Every thing in herhousehold arrangements was conducted on the most liberal plan, andexcepting a few old city friends, whom, to Lady Middleton's regret, shehad never dropped, she visited no one to whom an introduction could atall discompose the feelings of her young companions. Pleased to findherself more comfortably situated in that particular than she hadexpected, Elinor was very willing to compound for the want of much realenjoyment from any of their evening parties, which, whether at home orabroad, formed only for cards, could have little to amuse her.

  詹宁斯太太对两位达什伍德小姐总是非常和善,使她俩没有理由感到不满意。同样,她们也没有理由对太太的生活派头和那帮朋友感到不满。她安排家中大小事务总是极其宽怀大度,除了城里的几位老朋友,她从不去拜访别的人,唯恐引起她的年轻伙伴心绪不安。而使米德尔顿夫人感到遗憾的是,她母亲就是不肯舍弃那几位老朋友。埃丽诺高兴地发现,她在这方面的处境要比原先想象的好,于是她宁愿不再去计较那些实在没有意思的晚会。这些晚会不管在自己家里开,还是在别人家里开,充其量只是打打牌,对此她没有多大兴趣。

Colonel Brandon, who had a general invitation to the house, was withthem almost every day; he came to look at Marianne and talk to Elinor,who often derived more satisfaction from conversing with him than fromany other daily occurrence, but who saw at the same time with muchconcern his continued regard for her sister. She feared it was astrengthening regard. It grieved her to see the earnestness with whichhe often watched Marianne, and his spirits were certainly worse thanwhen at Barton.

  布兰登上校是詹宁斯家的常客,几乎每天都和她们呆在一起。他来这里,一是看看玛丽安,二是与埃丽诺说说话。埃丽诺和他交谈、往往比从其他日常事件中得到更大的满足。但她同时也十分关切地注意到,上校对她妹妹依然一片深情。她担心这种感情正在与日俱增。她伤心地发现,上校经常以情真意切的目光望着玛丽安,他的情绪显然比在巴顿时更加低沉。

About a week after their arrival, it became certain that Willoughby wasalso arrived. His card was on the table when they came in from themorning's drive.

  她们进城后大约过了一周左右,方才确知威洛比也已来到城里。那天上午她们乘车出游回来,看到桌上有他的名片。天啊!”玛丽安惊叫道,“我们出去的时候他来过这里。”埃丽诺得知威洛比就在伦敦,不禁喜上心头,便放心大胆地说道:“你放心好啦,他明日还会来的,”玛丽安仿佛没听见她的话,等詹宁斯太太一进屋,便拿着那张珍贵的名片溜走了。

"Good God!" cried Marianne, "he has been here while we were out."Elinor, rejoiced to be assured of his being in London, now ventured tosay, "Depend upon it, he will call again tomorrow." But Marianneseemed hardly to hear her, and on Mrs. Jennings's entrance, escaped withthe precious card.

  这件事一方面提高了埃丽诺的情绪,一方面恢复了她妹妹的兴致,而且使玛丽安比以前更加激动不安。自此刻起,她的心情压根儿没有平静过,她无时无刻不在期待见到他,以至于什么事情都不能干。第二天早晨,大家出去的时候,她执意要留在家里。

This event, while it raised the spirits of Elinor, restored to those ofher sister all, and more than all, their former agitation. From thismoment her mind was never quiet; the expectation of seeing him everyhour of the day, made her unfit for any thing. She insisted on beingleft behind, the next morning, when the others went out.

  埃丽诺出来后,一门心思想着伯克利街可能出现的情况。她们回来后,她只朝妹妹瞥了一眼,便知道威洛比没来第二趟。恰在这时,仆人送来一封短柬,搁在桌子上。

Elinor's thoughts were full of what might be passing in Berkeley Streetduring their absence; but a moment's glance at her sister when theyreturned was enough to inform her, that Willoughby had paid no secondvisit there. A note was just then brought in, and laid on the table.

  “给我的!”玛丽安嚷道,急忙抢上前去。

"For me!" cried Marianne, stepping hastily forward.

  “不,小姐,是给太太的。”

"No, ma'am, for my mistress."

  可玛丽安硬是不信,马上拿起信来。

But Marianne, not convinced, took it instantly up.

  “确实是给詹宁斯太太的,真叫人恼火!”

"It is indeed for Mrs. Jennings; how provoking!"

  “那你是在等信啦?”埃丽诺问道,她再也沉不住气了,

"You are expecting a letter, then?" said Elinor, unable to be longersilent.

  “是的!有一点——但不完全是。”

"Yes, a little--not much."

  略停了片刻,“玛丽安,你不信任我。”

After a short pause. "You have no confidence in me, Marianne."

  “得了吧,埃丽诺,你还有脸责怪我:你对谁都不信任!”

"Nay, Elinor, this reproach from YOU--you who have confidence in noone!"

  “我!”埃丽诺有些窘迫地应道。“玛丽安,我的确没有什么好说的。”

"Me!" returned Elinor in some confusion; "indeed, Marianne, I havenothing to tell."

  “我也没有,”玛丽安语气强硬地回答道。“那么,我们的情况是一样啦。我们都没有什么好说的:你是因为啥也不肯说,我是因为啥也没隐瞒。”

"Nor I," answered Marianne with energy, "our situations then are alike.We have neither of us any thing to tell; you, because you do notcommunicate, and I, because I conceal nothing."

  埃丽诺自己被指责为不坦率,而她又无法消除这种指责,心里很烦恼。在这种情况下,她不知如何能促使玛丽安坦率一些。

Elinor, distressed by this charge of reserve in herself, which she wasnot at liberty to do away, knew not how, under such circumstances, topress for greater openness in Marianne.

  詹宁斯太太很快回来了,一接到信便大声读了起来。信是米德尔顿夫人写来的,报告说他们已在头天晚上来到康迪特街,请她母亲和两位表姐妹明天晚上去作客。约翰爵士因为有事在身,她自己又患了重感冒,不能来伯克利街拜访。邀请被接受了,当践约时刻临近的时候,虽然出自对詹宁斯太太的通常礼貌,她们妹妹俩按说有必要陪她一同前往,不料埃丽诺费了半天唇舌才说服妹妹跟着一起去,因为她连威洛比的影子都没见到,当然不愿冒着让他再扑个空的危险,而去自寻开心。

Mrs. Jennings soon appeared, and the note being given her, she read italoud. It was from Lady Middleton, announcing their arrival in ConduitStreet the night before, and requesting the company of her mother andcousins the following evening. Business on Sir John's part, and aviolent cold on her own, prevented their calling in Berkeley Street.The invitation was accepted; but when the hour of appointment drewnear, necessary as it was in common civility to Mrs. Jennings, thatthey should both attend her on such a visit, Elinor had some difficultyin persuading her sister to go, for still she had seen nothing ofWilloughby; and therefore was not more indisposed for amusement abroad,than unwilling to run the risk of his calling again in her absence.

  到了夜里,埃丽诺发现:人的性情不因环境改变而发生很大变化,因为约翰爵士刚来到城里,就设法聚集了将近二十个年轻人,欢欢乐乐地开个舞会。然而,米德尔顿夫人并不同意他这么做。在乡下,未经过预先安排而举行舞会是完会可以的,但在伦敦,更重要、更难得的是要赚个风雅体面的好名声。如今,为了让几位小姐遂心如意,便贸然行事,让人知道米德尔顿夫人开了个小舞会,八九对舞伴,两把小提琴,只能从餐具柜里拿出点小吃。

Elinor found, when the evening was over, that disposition is notmaterially altered by a change of abode, for although scarcely settledin town, Sir John had contrived to collect around him, nearly twentyyoung people, and to amuse them with a ball. This was an affair,however, of which Lady Middleton did not approve. In the country, anunpremeditated dance was very allowable; but in London, where thereputation of elegance was more important and less easily attained, itwas risking too much for the gratification of a few girls, to have itknown that Lady Middleton had given a small dance of eight or ninecouple, with two violins, and a mere side-board collation.

  帕尔默夫妇也来参加舞会。几位女士自进城以来,一直没有见到帕尔默先生,因为他总是尽量避免引起他岳母的注意,从不接近她。女士们进来时,他连点相识的表示都没有。他略微望了她们一眼,从房间另一端朝詹宁斯太太点了下头。玛丽安进门后向室内环视了一下;看这一眼就足够了,他不在场——她坐下来,既不想自寻欢乐,又不想取悦他人。相聚了大约一个钟头之后,帕尔默先生款步向两位达什伍德小姐走去,说是真想不到会在城里见到她们。其实,布兰登上校最早是在他家听说她们来到城里的,而他自己一听说她们要来,还说了几句莫名其妙的话。

Mr. and Mrs. Palmer were of the party; from the former, whom they hadnot seen before since their arrival in town, as he was careful to avoidthe appearance of any attention to his mother-in-law, and thereforenever came near her, they received no mark of recognition on theirentrance. He looked at them slightly, without seeming to know who theywere, and merely nodded to Mrs. Jennings from the other side of theroom. Marianne gave one glance round the apartment as she entered: itwas enough--HE was not there--and she sat down, equally ill-disposed toreceive or communicate pleasure. After they had been assembled aboutan hour, Mr. Palmer sauntered towards the Miss Dashwoods to express hissurprise on seeing them in town, though Colonel Brandon had been firstinformed of their arrival at his house, and he had himself saidsomething very droll on hearing that they were to come.

  “我还以为你们都在德文郡呢!”他说。

"I thought you were both in Devonshire," said he.

  “真的吗?”埃丽诺应道。

"Did you?" replied Elinor.

  “你们什么时候回去?”

"When do you go back again?"

  “我也不晓得。”就这样,他们的谈话结束了。

"I do not know." And thus ended their discourse.

  玛丽安有生以来从没像当晚那样不愿跳舞,也从没跳得那样精疲力竭。一回到伯克利街,她就抱怨起来。

Never had Marianne been so unwilling to dance in her life, as she wasthat evening, and never so much fatigued by the exercise. Shecomplained of it as they returned to Berkeley Street.

  “唷哟,”詹宁斯太太说,“这原因嘛,我们是一清二楚的。假使来了那个咱们不指名道姓的人,你就一点也不累。说实在话,我们邀请他,他都不来见你一面,这未免不大像话。”

"Aye, aye," said Mrs. Jennings, "we know the reason of all that verywell; if a certain person who shall be nameless, had been there, youwould not have been a bit tired: and to say the truth it was not verypretty of him not to give you the meeting when he was invited."

  “邀请!”玛丽安嚷道。

"Invited!" cried Marianne.

  “我女儿米德尔顿夫人这样告诉我的。今天早晨,约翰爵士似乎在街上碰见过他。”

"So my daughter Middleton told me, for it seems Sir John met himsomewhere in the street this morning." Marianne said no more, butlooked exceedingly hurt. Impatient in this situation to be doingsomething that might lead to her sister's relief, Elinor resolved towrite the next morning to her mother, and hoped by awakening her fearsfor the health of Marianne, to procure those inquiries which had beenso long delayed; and she was still more eagerly bent on this measure byperceiving after breakfast on the morrow, that Marianne was againwriting to Willoughby, for she could not suppose it to be to any otherperson.

  玛丽安没再说什么,但看上去极为生气。埃丽诺见此情景非常焦急,便想设法解除妹妹的痛苦。她决定次日上午给母亲写封信,希望通过唤起她对玛丽安的健康的忧虑,对她进行拖延已久的询问。次日早晨吃过早饭,她发觉玛丽安又在给威洛比写信(她认为她不会给别人写信),便更加急切地要给母亲写信。大约正午时分,詹宁斯太太有事独自出去了,埃丽诺马上动手写信。此刻,玛丽安烦得无心做事,急得无意谈话,时而从一个窗口走到另一个窗口,时而坐在炉前垂头沉思。埃丽诺向母亲苦苦求告,讲述了这里发生的全部情况,说明她怀疑威洛比用情不专,恳请她务必尽到做母亲的本分和情意,要求玛丽安说明她同威洛比的真实关系。

About the middle of the day, Mrs. Jennings went out by herself onbusiness, and Elinor began her letter directly, while Marianne, toorestless for employment, too anxious for conversation, walked from onewindow to the other, or sat down by the fire in melancholy meditation.Elinor was very earnest in her application to her mother, relating allthat had passed, her suspicions of Willoughby's inconstancy, urging herby every plea of duty and affection to demand from Marianne an accountof her real situation with respect to him.

  她刚写好信,传来了敲门声,一听便知道有客人。随即有人传报,来客是布兰登上校。玛丽安早从窗口望见了他,因为什么客人也不想见,便在他进来之前走出房去。上校看上去比以往更加心事重重,看见只有埃丽诺一个人,虽然嘴里说很高兴,仿佛有什么要紧事要告诉她似的,但却一声不响地坐了好一阵。埃丽诺确信他有话要说,而且分明与她妹妹有关,便急切地等他开口。她有这样的感觉,已经不是第一次了。在这之前,上校曾不止一次地说过“你妹妹今天似乎不舒服”、“你妹妹似乎不很高兴”之类的话,好像他要透露或是打听她的什么特别情况。过了好几分钟,他终于打破了沉默,带着几分焦灼不安的语气问她:他什么时候能恭喜她得到个妹夫?埃丽诺没防备他会提出这么个问题,一时又找不到现成的答复,便只好采取简单常见的权宜之计,问他这是什么意思?他强作笑颜地答道:“你妹妹与威洛比订婚已是尽人皆知了。”

Her letter was scarcely finished, when a rap foretold a visitor, andColonel Brandon was announced. Marianne, who had seen him from thewindow, and who hated company of any kind, left the room before heentered it. He looked more than usually grave, and though expressingsatisfaction at finding Miss Dashwood alone, as if he had somewhat inparticular to tell her, sat for some time without saying a word.Elinor, persuaded that he had some communication to make in which hersister was concerned, impatiently expected its opening. It was not thefirst time of her feeling the same kind of conviction; for, more thanonce before, beginning with the observation of "your sister looksunwell to-day," or "your sister seems out of spirits," he had appearedon the point, either of disclosing, or of inquiring, somethingparticular about her. After a pause of several minutes, their silencewas broken, by his asking her in a voice of some agitation, when he wasto congratulate her on the acquisition of a brother? Elinor was notprepared for such a question, and having no answer ready, was obligedto adopt the simple and common expedient, of asking what he meant? Hetried to smile as he replied, "your sister's engagement to Mr.Willoughby is very generally known."

  “不可能尽人皆知,”埃丽诺回答说,“因为她自己家里人还不知道。”

"It cannot be generally known," returned Elinor, "for her own family donot know it."

  上校似乎吃了一惊,然后说:“请你原谅,我的问题怕是有点唐突无礼,不过,既然他们公开通信,我没想到还会有什么秘密可言。人们都在议论他们要结婚了,”

He looked surprised and said, "I beg your pardon, I am afraid myinquiry has been impertinent; but I had not supposed any secrecyintended, as they openly correspond, and their marriage is universallytalked of."

  “那怎么可能呢?你是听谁说起的?”

"How can that be? By whom can you have heard it mentioned?"

  “许多人——有些人你根本不认识,有些人和你极其密切——詹宁斯太太、帕尔默夫人和米德尔顿夫人。不过尽管如此,要不是仆人今天引我进门时,我无意中看见她手里拿着一封给威洛比的信,是你妹妹的笔迹,我也许还不敢相信呢——因为心里不愿相信的事情,总会找到一点怀疑的依据。我本来是来问个明白的,但是还没发问就确信无疑了。难道一切都最后敲定了?难道不可能—一?可是,我没有权利、也没有可能获得成功。请原谅我,达什伍德小姐。我知道我不该说这么多,不过我简直不知道该怎么办。你办事谨慎,这我完全信得过。告诉我,事情已经百分之百地决定了,再怎么争取也——如杀可能的话,剩下的问题就是再稍稍隐瞒一段时间。”

"By many--by some of whom you know nothing, by others with whom you aremost intimate, Mrs. Jennings, Mrs. Palmer, and the Middletons. Butstill I might not have believed it, for where the mind is perhapsrather unwilling to be convinced, it will always find something tosupport its doubts, if I had not, when the servant let me in today,accidentally seen a letter in his hand, directed to Mr. Willoughby inyour sister's writing. I came to inquire, but I was convinced before Icould ask the question. Is every thing finally settled? Is itimpossible to-? But I have no right, and I could have no chance ofsucceeding. Excuse me, Miss Dashwood. I believe I have been wrong insaying so much, but I hardly know what to do, and on your prudence Ihave the strongest dependence. Tell me that it is all absolutelyresolved on, that any attempt, that in short concealment, ifconcealment be possible, is all that remains."

  在埃丽诺听来,这一席话公开表白了他对她妹妹的眷恋,因而使她大为感动。她一下子说不出话,即使心情平静之后,心里还嘀咕了一阵,到底如何回答是好。威洛比和她妹妹之间的真实关系,她自己也是一无所知,勉强解释吧,可能不是说不到点子上,就是说过头。然而她又确信,玛丽安对威洛比的钟情无论结局如何,布兰登上校可能是没有希望成功的。在这同时,她还很想保护妹妹的行动不受指责,她经过再三考虑,觉得最明智、最宽厚的做法,还是不管她是否真的了解,真的信以为真,尽量多说点。因此她承认,虽然她从未听他们自己说过他们是什么关系,但是她对他们的相互钟爱并不怀疑,对他们相互通信并不感到惊讶。

These words, which conveyed to Elinor a direct avowal of his love forher sister, affected her very much. She was not immediately able tosay anything, and even when her spirits were recovered, she debated fora short time, on the answer it would be most proper to give. The realstate of things between Willoughby and her sister was so little knownto herself, that in endeavouring to explain it, she might be as liableto say too much as too little. Yet as she was convinced thatMarianne's affection for Willoughby, could leave no hope of ColonelBrandon's success, whatever the event of that affection might be, andat the same time wished to shield her conduct from censure, she thoughtit most prudent and kind, after some consideration, to say more thanshe really knew or believed. She acknowledged, therefore, that thoughshe had never been informed by themselves of the terms on which theystood with each other, of their mutual affection she had no doubt, andof their correspondence she was not astonished to hear.

  上校一声不响、聚精会神地听她说着。等她话音一落,他立即从椅子上立起身来,带着激动的口吻说道:“我祝愿你妹妹万事如意,祝愿威洛比极力争取配得上她。”说罢,辞别而去。

He listened to her with silent attention, and on her ceasing to speak,rose directly from his seat, and after saying in a voice of emotion,"to your sister I wish all imaginable happiness; to Willoughby that hemay endeavour to deserve her,"--took leave, and went away.

  埃丽诺从这次谈话中并没得到宽慰,借以减轻她在别的问题上的忐忑不安。相反,布兰登上校的不幸给她留下了一种忧郁感,因为一心等着让事实来加以印证,她甚至无法希望消除这种忧郁感。

Elinor derived no comfortable feelings from this conversation, tolessen the uneasiness of her mind on other points; she was left, on thecontrary, with a melancholy impression of Colonel Brandon'sunhappiness, and was prevented even from wishing it removed, by heranxiety for the very event that must confirm it.