A Tale of Two Cities  双城记

"But our Defarge," said Jacques Three, "is undoubtedly a goodRepublican? Eh?"

“可是我们的德伐日,”雅克三号说,“无疑是个优秀的共和分子,是么?”

"There is no better," the voluble Vengeance protested in hershrill notes, "in France."

“在法国没有比他更优秀的了,”口若悬河的复仇女神尖声尖气地肯定。

"Peace, little Vengeance," said Madame Defarge, laying her hand witha slight frown on her lieutenant's lips, "hear me speak. My husband,fellow-citizen, is a good Republican and a bold man; he has deservedwell of the Republic, and possesses its confidence. But my husband hashis weaknesses, and he is so weak as to relent towards this Doctor."

“别吵,小复仇,”德伐日太太略微皱了皱眉,伸出个指头挡在她助手的唇边,“听我说,公民伙计,我的丈夫是个优秀的共和分子,也是个大胆的人,值得共和国的尊重。他也获得了共和国的信任。但是他有他的弱点,他对医生心慈手软。”

"It is a great pity," croaked Jacques Three, dubiously shaking hishead, with his cruel fingers at his hungry mouth; "it is not quitelike a good citizen; it is a thing to regret."

“很遗憾,”雅克三号低沉地说,含义不明地摇着脑袋,几根残忍的手指又在嘴边猴急地抓挠。“那就不太像个好公民了,很遗憾。”

"See you," said madame, "I care nothing for this Doctor, I. He maywear his head or lose it, for any interest I have in him; it is allone to me. But, the Evremonde people are to be exterminated, and thewife and child must follow the husband and father."

“你们要明白,”老板娘说,“我对医生没兴趣。他丢不丢脑袋我不管,那对我都一样。但是埃佛瑞蒙德一家可得要斩草除根,老婆和孩子必须跟丈夫和爸爸去。”、

"She has a fine head for it," croaked Jacques Three. "I have seenblue eyes and golden hair there, and they looked charming whenSamson held them up." Ogre that he was, he spoke like an epicure.

“她有一个漂亮的脑袋跟着去呢,”雅克三号低沉地说。“我在这几看见过不少蓝眼睛金头发的脑袋,参孙提起那脑袋的样子可真迷人。”他虽是个吃人恶魔,说话倒像个美食家。

Madame Defarge cast down her eyes, and reflected a little.

德伐日太太垂下眼脸想了想。

"The child also," observed Jacques Three, with a meditativeenjoyment of his words, "has golden hair and blue eyes. And weseldom have a child there. It is a pretty sight!"

“还有那孩于也是金头发蓝眼睛,”雅克三号带着享受的神气思考着。“在那儿很少看见孩子。倒挺迷人的:”

"In a word," said Madame Defarge, coming out of her shortabstraction, "I cannot trust my husband in this matter. Not only doI feel, since last night, that I dare not confide to him the detailsof my projects; but also I feel that if I delay, there is danger ofhis giving warning, and then they might escape."

“总而言之,”德伐日太太停顿了片刻,说道,“这事我信不过我丈夫。我从昨天晚上起就感到不但不能把我计划的细节告诉他,而旦动手要快,否则他还可能走漏消息,让他们跑掉。”

"That must never be," croaked Jacques Three; "no one must escape. Wehave not half enough as it is. We ought to have six score a day."

“绝不能让他们跑掉,”雅克三号低沉地说。“一个也不准。就现在这种情况人数还不到一半呢。应该每天杀他一百二十个的。”

"In a word," Madame Defarge went on, "my husband has not my reasonfor pursuing this family to annihilation, and I have not his reasonfor regarding this Doctor with any sensibility. I must act for myself,therefore. Come hither, little citizen."

“总而言之,”德伐日太太说下去,“我要把这一家斩草除根的道理我的老公不理解;他对医生那么关怀的道理我也想不通。因此我得亲手采取行动。来呀,小公民。”

The wood-sawyer, who held her in the respect, and himself in thesubmission, of mortal fear, advanced with his hand to his red cap.

锯木工用手碰了碰红便帽,走了过来。他对她毕恭毕敬,服服帖帖,怕得要命。

"Touching those signals, little citizen," said Madame Defarge,sternly, "that she made to the prisoners; you are ready to bearwitness to them this very day?"

“你今天就可以作证,证明那些手势么,小公民?德伐日太太严厉地说。

"Ay, ay, why not!" cried the sawyer. "Every day, in all weathers,from two to four, always signalling, sometimes with the little one,sometimes without. I know what I know. I have seen with my eyes."

“可以,可以,为什么不可以!”锯木工叫道,“每天,不论天晴下雨,从两点到四点,总在那儿打手势,有时带着那小的,有时没带。我知道的事我是知道的。我是亲眼看见的。”

He made all manner of gestures while he spoke, as if in incidentalimitation of some few of the great diversity of signals that he hadnever seen.

他说话时做了许多手势,仿佛偶然模仿着几个他其实从没见过的复杂手势。

"Clearly plots," said Jacques Three. "Transparently!"

“显然是搞阴谋,”雅克三号说,“再清楚不过了。”

"There is no doubt of the Jury?" inquired Madame Defarge, lettingher eyes turn to him with a gloomy smile.

“陪审团不会有问题吧?”德伐日太太露出个阴沉的微笑把眼光转向他说。

"Rely upon the patriotic Jury, dear citizeness. I answer for myfellow Jurymen."

“相信爱国的陪审团吧,亲爱的女公民,我可以为我陪审团的伙计们打包票。”

"Now, let me see," said Madame Defarge, pondering again. "Yet oncemore! Can I spare this Doctor to my husband? I have no feelingeither way. Can I spare him?"

“现在我来想想,”德伐日太太又沉思起来,“再想一想吧!为了我那老公,我能不能放过医生呢?放不放过对我都一样。我能放过他么?”

"He would count as one head," observed Jacques Three, in a lowvoice. "We really have not heads enough; it would be a pity, I think."

“他也要算一个脑袋呢,”雅克三号低声说。“我们现有的脑袋还嫌不够,放过了怪可惜的,我觉得。”

"He was signalling with her when I saw her," argued MadameDefarge; "I cannot speak of one without the other; and I must not besilent, and trust the case wholly to him, this little citizen here.For, I am not a bad witness."

“我见到那女人的时候,医生也跟她一样在打手势呢!”德伐日太太争辩道,“我不能谈这个不谈那个,我不能把这案子全交给这个小公民去办,因为我做起证人来也并不差。”

The Vengeance and Jacques Three vied with each other in theirfervent protestations that she was the most admirable and marvellousof witnesses. The little citizen, not to be outdone, declared her tobe a celestial witness.

复仇女神和雅克三号彼此争先恐后地肯定她是最值得尊重,也是最精采的证人。小公民不甘落后,便说她是举世无双的证人。

"He must take his chance," said Madame Defarge. "No, I cannotspare him! You are engaged at three o'clock; you are going to seethe batch of to-day executed.- You?"

“不,我不能放过他,”德伐日太太说,“他得凭命去闯了!你三点钟有事,要去看今天杀的这一批——是吗?”

The question was addressed to the wood-sawyer, who hurriedly repliedin the affirmative: seizing the occasion to add that he was the mostardent of Republicans, and that he would be in effect the mostdesolate of Republicans, if anything prevented him from enjoying thepleasure of smoking his afternoon pipe in the contemplation of thedroll national barber. He was so very demonstrative herein, that hemight have been suspected (perhaps was, by the dark eyes that lookedcontemptuously at him out of Madame Defarge's head) of having hissmall individual fears for his own personal safety, every hour inthe day.

这话问的是锯木工。锯木工赶快说他也要去,而且抓紧机会补充说,他是最积极的共和分子。实际上若是有什么东西使他失去了享受一边抽午后烟、一边欣赏国家级剃头师傅精采表演的机会,他就会成为最孤独的共和分子了。他的表白有点过分,甚至叫人怀疑他每时每刻都在为自己那渺小的安全担心。而他也许确实在受着怀疑,因为德伐日太太一双黑眼睛正轻蔑地望着他。

"I," said madame, "am equally engaged at the same place. After it isover- say at eight to-night- come you to me, in Saint Antoine, andwe will give information against these people at my Section."

“我也同样要到那儿去。”老板娘说。“那儿的事结束之后,你们就到我那儿,到圣安托万去,就定在八点吧,我们要到我那个区去揭发这几个人。”

The wood-sawyer said he would be proud and flattered to attend thecitizeness. The citizeness looking at him, he became embarrassed,evaded her glance as a small dog would have done, retreated amonghis wood, and hid his confusion over the handle of his saw.

锯木工说他若是能陪伴女公民,他会引以为荣,感到骄傲的。女公民却白了他一眼,弄得他很尴尬,像小狗一样躲着她的目光,钻到木柴堆里拉起锯来,借以掩饰自己的狼狈。

Madame Defarge beckoned the Juryman and The Vengeance a littlenearer to the door, and there expounded her further views to themthus:

德伐日太太招呼陪审员和复仇女神往门边靠了靠,向他俩进一步说明了她的观点:

"She will now be at home, awaiting the moment of his death. She willbe mourning and grieving. She will be in a state of mind to impeachthe justice of the Republic. She will be full of sympathy with itsenemies. I will go to her."

“那女的现在准在家等着他死去的时刻。她会哀悼,会痛苦,一定会对共和国的审判心怀不满,对共和国的敌人满怀同情。我要到她那儿去。”

"What an admirable woman; what an adorable woman!" exclaimed JacquesThree, rapturously. "Ah, my cherished!" cried The Vengeance; andembraced her.

“多么令人钦佩的女人,多么值得崇拜的女人!”雅克三号欣喜若狂,叫道。“啊,我的心肝宝贝!”复仇女神叫了起来,拥抱了她。

"Take you my knitting," said Madame Defarge, placing it in herlieutenant's hands, "and have it ready for me in my usual seat. Keepme my usual chair. Go you there, straight, for there will probablybe a greater concourse than usual, to-day."

“你把我的编织活儿拿去,”德伐日太太把毛线放到助手手里,“把它放在我平时的座位上,占好座包。马上去,因为十有八九今天的人会比平常多。”

"I willingly obey the orders of my Chief," said The Vengeance withalacrity, and kissing her cheek. "You will not be late?"

“我衷心接受上级的命令,”复仇女神敏捷作答,而且亲了亲她的面颊。“你不会迟到吧?”

"I shall be there before the commencement."

“行刑开始之前我准到。”

"And before the tumbrils arrive. Be sure you are there, my soul,"said The Vengeance, calling after her, for she had already turned intothe street, "before the tumbrils arrive!"

“囚车到达之前。一准要到,我的宝贝,”复仇女神对着她的背影说,因为她已转身上了街。“囚车到达之前!”

Madame Defarge slightly waved her hand, to imply that she heard, andmight be relied upon to arrive in good time, and so went through themud, and round the corner of the prison wall. The Vengeance and theJuryman, looking after her as she walked away, were highlyappreciative of her fine figure, and her superb moral endowments.

德伐日太太轻轻挥了挥手,表示她听见了,一定准时到达,然后便穿过泥泞、绕过了监狱大墙。复仇女神和陪审员望着她远去,对她那漂亮的身影和无与伦比的道德秉赋表示了崇高的赞赏。

There were many women at that time, upon whom the time laid adreadfully disfiguring hand; but, there was not one among them more tobe dreaded than this ruthless woman, now taking her way along thestreets. Of a strong and fearless character, of shrewd sense andreadiness, of great determination, of that kind of beauty which notonly seems to impart to its possessor firmness and animosity, but tostrike into others an instinctive recognition of those qualities;the troubled time would have heaved her up, under any circumstances.But, imbued from her childhood with a brooding sense of wrong, andan inveterate hatred of a class, opportunity had developed her intoa tigress. She was absolutely without pity. If she had ever had thevirtue in her, it had quite gone out of her.

那时的许多妇女都被时代之手捏弄得可怕地变了形,却没有一个妇女能比现在走在大街上的这个无情的女人更可怕的了。她有坚强勇敢的性格,精明敏捷的头脑,还有巨大的决心。她具有一种美,那美不但赋予了她稳定坚实、苦大仇深的特色,而且使人不由得由衷地赞美这一特色。无论情况如何,那“混乱的时代”是必然会使她出人头地的。但是由于她从儿童时代起就深感含冤受屈,养成了根深蒂固的阶级仇恨,机会便把她发展成了一只母老虎。她是绝对没有怜惜之情的。即使曾有过也早已泯灭了。

It was nothing to her, that an innocent man was to die for thesins of his forefathers; she saw, not him, but them. It was nothing toher, that his wife was to be made a widow and his daughter anorphan; that was insufficient punishment, because they were hernatural enemies and her prey, and as such had no right to live. Toappeal to her, was made hopeless by her having no sense of pity,even for herself. If she had been laid low in the streets, in any ofthe many encounters in which she had been engaged, she would nothave pitied herself; nor, if she had been ordered to the axeto-morrow, would she have gone to it with any softer feeling than afierce desire to change places with the man who sent here there.

一个清白无辜的男人要为父辈的罪行而死亡,这在她完全不算一回事。她看见的不是他,而是他的父辈。那个男人的妻子要变成寡妇,女儿要变成孤儿,这在她也不算一回事。那种惩罚还不够,因为她们都是她天生的敌人,是她的战利品,本没有活下去的权利。要使她谅解是办不到的,她没有怜惜之心,甚至对自己也如此。若是她在自己参加过的战斗中倒下了,她也不会怜惜自己;若是她被送上断头台,她也只会咬牙切齿恨不得让送她上断头台的人跟她易地而处,却没有丝毫怨艾伤感的柔情。

Such a heart Madame Defarge carried under her rough robe. Carelesslyworn, it was a becoming robe enough, in a certain weird way, and herdark hair looked rich under her coarse red cap. Lying hidden in herbosom, was a loaded pistol. Lying hidden at her waist, was a sharpeneddagger. Thus accoutred, and walking with the confident tread of such acharacter, and with the supple freedom of a woman who had habituallywalked in her girlhood, bare-foot and bare-legged, on the brownsea-sand, Madame Defarge took her way along the streets.

在德伐日太太那粗布袍子下而的就是这样一颗心。那布袍她随意穿着,却很合身,但带几分怪诞。那一头黑发在粗糙的红便帽之下显得尤其丰密。她胸前掖了一把子弹上膛的手枪。腰间别了一把磨得飞快的匕首。她便以这样一身装束、这样一个角色的自信步伐在大街上走着:表现了习惯于光着腿赤着脚在褐色的沙滩上行走的妇女的矫健和轻松。

Now, when the journey of the travelling coach, at that very momentwaiting for the completion of its load, had been planned out lastnight, the difficulty of taking Miss Pross in it had much engagedMr. Lorry's attention. It was not merely desirable to avoidoverloading the coach, but it was of the highest importance that thetime occupied in examining it and its passengers, should be reduced tothe utmost; since their escape might depend on the saving of only afew seconds here and there. Finally, he had proposed, after anxiousconsideration, that Miss Pross and Jerry, who were at liberty to leavethe city, should leave it at three o'clock in the lightest-wheeledconveyance known to that period. Unencumbered with luggage, they wouldsoon overtake the coach, and, passing it and preceding it on the road,would order its horses in advance, and greatly facilitate its progressduring the precious hours of the night, when delay was the most tobe dreaded.

此时那辆旅行马车正在等着旅客到齐。昨天晚上罗瑞先生为普洛丝小姐是否坐这辆车曾经煞费踌躇。马车需要避免超重,尤其需要尽量缩短检查马车和乘客的时间,因为他们是否能逃掉大有可能决定于在这儿那儿省下的分分秒秒。经过苦苦思索,他终于决定让普洛丝小姐和杰瑞去坐那时很有名的最轻便型马车,在三点钟出发,因为他们可以自由出入巴黎。他们没有行车拖累,可以很快便赶上驿车,赶到前面去,事先给驿车雇好马匹,使它在夜间宝贵的时间里迅速前进—一夜里是最怕耽误的。

Seeing in this arrangement the hope of rendering real service inthat pressing emergency, Miss Pross hailed it with joy. She andJerry had beheld the coach start, had known who it was that Solomonbrought, had passed some ten minutes in tortures of suspense, and werenow concluding their arrangements to follow the coach, even asMadame Defarge, taking her way through the streets, now drew nearerand nearer to the else-deserted lodging in which they held theirconsultation.

普洛丝小姐明白了照这种安排她在那千钧一发的时刻可以起到的真正作用,便高高兴兴地同意了。她跟杰瑞看到马车出发,看清楚了所罗门送来的是什么人,又提心吊胆地忙了十来分钟,现在正做着追赶驿车的最后准备。这时德伐日太太正在街上行走,距离这间寓所越来越近了一—这里的房客已全都撤离,只有他俩还在商量:

"Now what do you think, Mr. Cruncher," said Miss Pross, whoseagitation was so great that she could hardly speak, or stand, or move,or live: "what do you think of our not starting from this courtyard?Another carriage having already gone from here to-day, it might awakensuspicion."

“现在,克朗彻先生,”普洛丝小姐说,她激动得话也说不出,站也站不住,动也不会动,连活都不知道该怎么活下去了。“你觉得我们若是不从这个院子出发,怎么样?今天已经从这儿走了一辆车,再走一辆车会引起疑心的。”

"My opinion, miss," returned Mr. Cruncher, "is as you're right.Likewise wot I'll stand by you, right or wrong."

“我认为你说得对,小姐,”克朗彻先生回答。“而且我总是拥护你的,不管你对不对。”

"I am so distracted with fear and hope for our preciouscreatures," said Miss Pross, wildly crying, "that I am incapable offorming any plan. Are you capable of forming any plan, my dear goodMr. Cruncher?"

“我为几个心肝宝贝又是害怕、又抱着希望,简直都急疯了,”普洛丝小姐放声大哭,“我是什么主意都想不出来了。你能出个主意么,我亲爱的可怜的克朗彻先生?”

"Respectin' a future spear o' life, miss," returned Mr. Cruncher, "Ihope so. Respectin' any present use o' this here blessed old head o'mind, I think not. Would you do me the favour, miss, to take notice o'two promises and wows wot it is my wishes fur to record in this herecrisis?"

“要说对将来的生活出点主意,我大概还能行,小姐,”克朗彻回答,“要说在此刻开动我这上帝保佑的老脑筋,我怕是办不到了。在眼前的紧急关头我想作出两个保证,发两道誓言,你能帮助我记住么,小姐?”

"Oh, for gracious sake!" cried Miss Pross, still wildly crying,"record them at once, and get them out of the way, like an excellentman."

“啊,天呐!”普洛丝小姐还在号啕痛哭说,“我马上记住,可你得像个出色的男子汉一样别把它挂在心上。”

"First," said Mr. Cruncher, who was all in a tremble, and whospoke with an ashy and solemn visage, "them poor things well out o'this, never no more will I do it, never no more!"

“首先,”克朗彻先生全身发抖,说话时面如死灰,神情庄重,“只要那几个可怜的人能安全脱险,我以后就不再干那种事了,再也不干了!”

"I am quite sure, Mr. Cruncher," returned Miss Pross, "that younever will do it again, whatever it is, and I be, you not to thinkit necessary to mention more particularly what it is."

“我很肯定,克朗彻先生,”普洛丝小姐回答,“你以后决不会再干了,不管是什么。我求你不要认为需要特别说明那是什么。”

"No, miss," returned Jerry, "it shall not be named to you. Second:them poor things well out o' this, and never no more will Iinterfere with Mrs. Cruncher's flopping, never no more!"

“不会的,小姐,”杰瑞回答,“我是不会告诉你的。第二,只要那几个可怜的人能平安脱险,我就再也不会干涉克朗彻太太跪地做祈祷了。再也不会了!”

"Whatever housekeeping arrangement that may be," said Miss Pross,striving to dry her eyes and compose herself, "I have no doubt it isbest that Mrs. Cruncher should have it entirely under her ownsuperintendence.- O my poor darlings!"

“‘不管是什么家务事,”普洛丝小姐擦着眼泪努力镇定着自己说,“我都相信,还是完全交给克朗彻太太经管为好。啊,我可怜的宝贝们!”

"I go so far as to say, miss, moreover," proceeded Mr. Cruncher,with a most alarming tendency to hold forth as from a pulpit- "and letmy words be took down and took to Mrs. Cruncher through yourself- thatwot my opinions respectin' flopping has undergone a change, and thatwot I only hope with all my heart as Mrs. Cruncher may be a floppingat the present time."

“我甚至还要说,小姐,”克朗彻先生接着讲下去,样子很令人吃惊,好像是在布道台上发表演说,“请你记下我的话,亲自告诉我太太,我对做祷告的事已经改变了看法。我倒打心眼里希望克朗彻太太这时在为我们跪下来做祷告呢!”

"There, there, there! I hope she is, my dear man," cried thedistracted Miss Pross, "and I hope she finds it answering herexpectations."

“好了,好了,好了,我希望她在祷告,亲爱的,”急得发疯的普洛丝小姐叫道,“还希望她的祷告应验!”

"Forbid it," proceeded Mr. Cruncher, with additional solemnity,additional slowness, and additional tendency to hold forth and holdout, "as anything wot I have ever said or done should be visited on myearnest wishes for them poor creeturs now! Forbid it as we shouldn'tall flop (if it was anyways conwenient) to get 'em out o' this heredismal risk! Forbid it, miss! Wot I say, for-BID it!" This was Mr.Cruncher's conclusion after a protracted but vain endeavour to finda better one.

“千万别应验,”克朗彻先生说下去,说得更庄严、更缓慢、更有坚持到底的意思。“可不能让我说过的话、干过的事现在报应在我为这些可怜的人许的愿上!别应验,我们都应当跪下来(若是方便的话)祈祷他们逃出这种可怕的危险。别应验,小姐:我要说的是,别应—一验!”这是克朗彻先生在长期努力想得到一个更好的结论之后所下的结论。

And still Madame Defarge, pursuing her way along the streets, camenearer and nearer.

这时,德伐日太太正沿着大街走来,越来越近了。

"If we ever get back to our native land," said Miss Pross, "youmay rely upon my telling Mrs. Cruncher as much as I may be able toremember and understand of what you have so impressively said; andat all events you may be sure that I shall bear witness to yourbeing thoroughly in earnest at this dreadful time. Now, pray let usthink! My esteemed Mr. Cruncher, let us think!"

“你说得太动人了,”普洛丝小姐说,“若是我们能回到故乡,请相信我,我一定把我记得住而又听懂了的话转告克朗彻太太。而且,无论发生了什么事,你都可以相信我,对你在这个可怕时刻的一本正经的态度可以作证。现在,请让我们来想一想,我尊重的克朗彻先生,让我们来想一想!”

Still, Madame Defarge, pursuing her way along the streets, camenearer and nearer.

这时,德伐日太太正沿着大街走来,越来越近了。

"If you were to go before," said Miss Pross, "and stop the vehicleand horses from coming here, and were to wait somewhere for me;wouldn't that be best?"

“若是你能先走一步,”普洛丝小姐说,“叫马车别到这儿来,另找个地方等我,是不是会更好?”

Mr. Cruncher thought it might be best.

克朗彻认为那样会更好。

"Where could you wait for me?" asked Miss Pross.

“那你在什么地方等我呢?”普洛丝小姐问。

Mr. Cruncher was so bewildered that he could think of no localitybut Temple Bar. Alas! Temple Bar was hundreds of miles away, andMadame Defarge was drawing very near indeed.

克朗彻满脑子糊涂,除了伦敦法学会,他想不出别的地点。可是天哪!伦敦法学会远在千里之外,而德伐日太太只不过咫尺之遥

"By the cathedral door," said Miss Pross. "Would it be much out ofthe way, to take me in, near the great cathedral door between thetwo towers?"

“在大教堂门口吧,”普洛丝小姐说。“我在那地方上车不太绕道吧?在大教堂两座钟楼中间那大门口?”

"No, miss," answered Mr. Cruncher.

“不绕道,小姐,”克朗彻回答。

"Then, like the best of men," said Miss Pross, "go to theposting-house straight, and make that change."

“那么,就像个最好的男子汉一样,马上去车站,把路线改了,”普洛丝小姐说。

"I am doubtful," said Mr. Cruncher, hesitating and shaking his head,"about leaving of you, you see. We don't know what may happen."

“我离开你可有点不放心,”克朗彻先生犹豫起来,摇着头说。“你看,不知道会发生什么情况的。”

"Heaven knows we don't," returned Miss Pross, "but have no fearfor me. Take me in at the cathedral, at Three o'Clock, or as near itas you can, and I am sure it will be better than our going fromhere. I feel certain of it. There! Bless you, Mr. Cruncher! Think- notof me, but of the lives that may depend on both of us!"

“那只有天才知道,”普洛丝小姐回答。“别为我担心。三点钟或略早一点到大教堂来接我,我相信那要比从这儿出发好得多,我肯定。好了!上帝保佑你,克朗彻先生!别顾着我,顾着那几条命吧,那得靠我们呢!”

This exordium, and Miss Pross's two hands in quite agonised entreatyclasping his, decided Mr. Cruncher. With an encouraging nod or two, heimmediately went out to alter the arrangements, and left her byherself to follow as she had proposed.

这一番言辞,再加上普洛丝小姐两只手攥住他的手,表现了痛苦的请求,使克朗彻先生下定了决心。他点了点头,表示鼓励,便去改变行车路线了,留下她一个人按自己的建议去跟他会合。

The having originated a precaution which was already in course ofexecution, was a great relief to Miss Pross. The necessity ofcomposing her appearance so that it should attract no special noticein the streets, was another relief. She looked at her watch, and itwas twenty minutes past two. She had no time to lose, but must getready at once.

想出了这么一个预防措施,而且已经开始执行,普洛丝小姐大大她松了一口气。她的外表必须镇静如常,以免引起特别注意,这也使她安定下来。她看看表,两点二十分。她再也不能浪费时间了,必须立即作好准备。

Afraid, in her extreme perturbation, of the loneliness of thedeserted rooms, and of half-imagined faces peeping from behind everyopen door in them, Miss Pross got a basin of cold water and beganlaving her eyes, which were swollen and red. Haunted by her feverishapprehensions, she could not bear to have her sight obscured for aminute at a time by the dripping water, but constantly paused andlooked round to see that there was no one watching her. In one ofthose pauses she recoiled and cried out, for she saw a figure standingin the room.

她心里乱成一团。没了人的屋子空荡荡的,她害怕;每一道开着的门背后都仿佛有面孔在窥视,她也怕。普洛丝小姐打了一盆水开始洗她那双红肿的眼睛。她满怀莫名的恐俱,很怕眼睛上的水会暂时挡住了视线,因此不断停下来四面瞧瞧,怕有人在看她。有一次她刚停下来却不禁大叫起来,往后一退,因为她见到一个人影站在屋里。

The basin fell to the ground broken, and the water flowed to thefeet of Madame Defarge. By strange stern ways, and through muchstaining blood, those feet had come to meet that water.

脸盆落到地下摔碎了,水流到德伐日太太脚边——那双脚曾从血泊中走过,步伐威严而独特。”

Madame Defarge looked coldly at her, and said, "The wife ofEvremonde; where is she?"

德伐日太太冷冷地望着她说,“埃佛瑞蒙德的太太到哪儿去了?”

It flashed upon Miss Pross's mind that the doors were all standingopen, and would suggest the flight. Her first act was to shut them.There were four in the room, and she shut them all. She then placedherself before the door of the chamber which Lucie had occupied.

普洛丝小姐突然想起所有的门分开着,会叫人想到逃跑。她的第一个动作便是把门全都关了起来。屋里有四道门,她全关上了。然后她站在露西的房门口。

Madame Defarge's dark eyes followed her through this rapid movement,and rested on her when it was finished. Miss Pross had nothingbeautiful about her; years had not tamed the wildness, or softened thegrimness, of her appearance; but, she too was a determined woman inher different way, and she measured Madame Defarge with her eyes,every inch.

德伐日太太深色的眼睛跟随着她那迅速的行动,然后落在她身上。岁月并不曾驯服普洛丝小姐的野性,也不曾让她那粗糙的外形变得柔和。她也是个强悍的女人,虽然路数不同。她也用眼睛打量了德伐日太太身上的每一部分。

"You might, from your appearance, be the wife of Lucifer," said MissPross, in her breathing. "Nevertheless, you shall not get the betterof me. I am an Englishwoman."

“别看你那样子像魔鬼的老婆,”普洛丝小姐细声说,“你占不了我的上风,我可是个英国女人。”

Madame Defarge looked at her scornfully, but still with something ofMiss Pross's own perception that they two were at bay. She saw atight, hard, wiry woman before her, as Mr. Lorry had seen in thesame figure a woman with a strong hand, in the years gone by. She knewfull well that Miss Pross was the family's devoted friend; MissPross knew full well that Madame Defarge was the family's malevolentenemy.

德伐日太太轻蔑地望着她,她的感觉跟普洛丝小姐却也差不多;她俩可算是狭路相逢了。德伐日太太眼前是个结实、健壮、矫捷的妇女,正跟多年前罗瑞先生眼前那个胳膊结实的妇女一样。德伐日太太很清楚,普洛丝小姐是这家的忠实朋友;普洛丝小姐也很清楚,德伐日太太是这家的凶恶敌人。

"On my way yonder," said Madame Defarge, with a slight movement ofher hand towards the fatal spot, "where they reserve my chair and myknitting for me, I am come to make my compliments to her in passing. Iwish to see her."

“我要到那边去,”德伐日太太一只手往那杀人的地方略微挥了一挥,“她们在那几给我保留了座位和我的毛线活儿。我是顺道来向她致敬的。我想见见她。”

"I know that your intentions are evil," said Miss Pross, "and youmay depend upon it, I'll hold my own against them."

“我知道你不怀好意,”普洛丝小姐说。“不过你放心,你那坏心眼休想在我面前得逞。”

Each spoke in her own language; neither understood the other'swords; both were very watchful, and intent to deduce from look andmanner, what the unintelligible words meant.

两人一个说法语,一个说英语,谁也听不懂谁的话,可彼此都很警惕,想从对方的神色态度推测出没听懂的意思。

"It will do her no good to keep herself concealed from me at thismoment," said Madame Defarge. "Good patriots will know what thatmeans. Let me see her. Go tell her that I wish to see her. Do youhear?"

“这个时候把她藏起来不让她见我,对她可没有好处,”德伐日太太说。“优秀的爱国者都明白那是什么意思。让我见她。告诉她我要见她。听见了没有?”

"If those eyes of yours were bed-winches," returned Miss Pross, "andI was an English four-poster, they shouldn't loose a splinter of me.No, you wicked foreign woman; I am your match."

“就算你那眼睛骨碌碌转得像辘轳,”普洛丝小姐回答,“我可是张四根柱子的英国床,任你眼睛怎么转,也别想动我一分一毫。不行,你这个恶毒的女老外,我今儿跟你泡上了。”

Madame Defarge was not likely to follow these idiomatic remarks indetail; but, she so far understood them as to perceive that she wasset at naught.

看来德伐日太太对这些村言俚语并不理解,但却明白对方并没有把自己放在眼里。

"Woman imbecile and pig-like!" said Madame Defarge, frowning. "Itake no answer from you. I demand to see her. Either tell her that Idemand to see her, or stand out of the way of the door and let me goto her!" This, with an angry explanatory wave of her right arm.

“白痴,蠢猪!”德伐日太太皱着眉头。“我不要你回答,我要求跟她见面。你去告诉她,我要见地,再不然就别站在门口,让我自己进去!”说时她怒气冲冲打着手势。

"I little thought," said Miss Pross, "that I should ever want tounderstand your nonsensical language; but I would give all I have,except the clothes I wear, to know whether you suspect the truth, orany part of it."

“我才懒得听你那瞎胡闹的外国话呢,”普洛丝小姐说,“不过为了知道你是否猜到了真象(或许只猜到一部分),我倒愿意把我的一切都送给人——除了这一身衣服之外。”

Neither of them for a single moment released the other's eyes.Madame Defarge had not moved from the spot where she stood when MissPross first became aware of her; but, she now advanced one step.

两人彼此目不转睛地盯着。德伐日太太从普洛丝小姐意识到她来到这儿以后就在原地没动,可现在她前进了一步。

"I am a Briton," said Miss Pross, "I am desperate. I don't care anEnglish Twopence for myself. I know that the longer I keep you here,the greater hope there is for my Ladybird. I'll not leave a handful ofthat dark hair upon your head, if you lay a finger on me!"

“我可是个不列颠人,”普洛丝小姐说。“今天我豁出去了,我愿拿这条不值两便士的命拼了。我知道我把你缠在这里的时间越长,我那小鸟儿就越有希望。你要是敢碰我一指头,我就把你那黑头发拔个精光,一根不剩!”

Thus Miss Pross, with a shake of her head and a flash of her eyesbetween every rapid sentence, and every rapid sentence a whole breath.Thus Miss Pross, who had never struck a blow in her life.

这样,普洛丝小姐每匆忙说完一句话就要摇一摇脑袋,瞪一瞪眼睛,而她的每句话又都说得气喘吁吁。她像这样开始了战斗—一她可是一辈于没跟人干过仗的。

But, her courage was of that emotional nature that it brought theirrepressible tears into her eyes. This was a courage that MadameDefarge so little comprehended as to mistake for weakness. "Ha, ha!"she laughed, "you poor wretch! What are you worth! I address myself tothat Doctor." Then she raised her voice and called out, "CitizenDoctor! Wife of Evremonde! Child of Evremonde! Any person but thismiserable fool, answer the Citizeness Defarge!"

可是她的勇气却带着感情冲动的性质,她的眼里已不禁噙满了泪珠。对她这种形式的勇气表现,德伐日太太却误会了,以为是软弱。“哈!哈!”她笑了,“你这个可怜虫!还充什么好汉!我要找医生讲话。”说时便放开嗓门叫了起来,“医生公民!埃佛瑞蒙德太太!埃佛瑞蒙德家的媳妇!除了这个可怜兮的笨蛋,你们谁来跟女公民德伐日答话?”

Perhaps the following silence, perhaps some latent disclosure in theexpression of Miss Pross's face, perhaps a sudden misgiving apart fromeither suggestion, whispered to Madame Defarge that they were gone.Three of the doors she opened swiftly, and looked in.

也许是由于随之而来的沉默,也许是由于普洛丝小姐的表情无意中泄露了天机,也许是由于与两者无关的突然灵机一动,总之德伐日太太看出他们已经走掉了。她赶紧打开了三道门,往里面看。

"Those rooms are all in disorder, there has been hurried packing,there are odds and ends upon the ground. There is no one in thatroom behind you! Let me look."

“三间屋子都乱糟糟的,有人匆忙打过行李,七零八碎的东西扔了满地。你身后的屋里怕也是没有人了!让我看看!”

"Never!" said Miss Pross, who understood the request as perfectly asMadame Defarge understood the answer.

“休想!”普洛丝小姐完全明白她的要求,正如德伐日太太完全明白她的回答一样。

"If they are not in that room, they are gone, and can be pursued andbrought back," said Madame Defarge to herself.

“他们若是不在那屋里,便是逃跑了。还可以派人去追,把他们抓回来,”德伐日太太自言自语。

"As long as you don't know whether they are in that room or not, youare uncertain what to do," said Miss Pross to herself; "and youshall not know that, if I can prevent your knowing it; and knowthat, or not know that, you shall not leave here while I can holdyou."

“只要你弄不清楚她们究竟在不在这屋里,你就无法决定该怎么办,”普洛丝小姐自言自语。“只要我不让你弄清楚,你就别想弄清楚。不管你清楚不清楚,我只要能缠住你,你就别想离开这儿。”

"I have been in the streets from the first, nothing has stoppedme, I will tear you to pieces, but I will have you from that door,"said Madame Defarge.

“我从小就在街面上跑,什么东西也没拦住过我。我能把你撕得粉碎,我现在得把你从门口轰走,”德伐日太太说。

"We are alone at the top of a high house in a solitary courtyard, weare not likely to be heard, and I pray for bodily strength to keep youhere, while every minute you are here is worth a hundred thousandguineas to my darling," said Miss Pross.

“我们这院子孤零零的,高楼顶上又只有我们两个,看样子不会有人听见。我祈祷上帝给我力量把你缠住,你在这儿的每一分钟对我那宝贝儿都值十万金币呢!”普洛丝小姐说。

Madame Defarge made at the door. Miss Pross, on the instinct ofthe moment, seized her round the waist in both her arms, and heldher tight. It was in vain for Madame Defarge to struggle and tostrike; Miss Pross, with the vigorous tenacity of love, always so muchstronger than hate, clasped her tight, and even lifted her from thefloor in the struggle that they had. The two hands of Madame Defargebuffeted and tore her face; but, Miss Pross, with her head down,held her round the waist, and clung to her with more than the holdof a drowning woman.

德伐日太太往屋里便闯,普洛丝小姐一时性起,伸出双臂把她紧紧拦腰抱住。德伐日太太又是挣扎,又是殴打,但都无济于事。普洛丝小姐满怀挚爱,有坚韧的活力,把她抱得很紧——爱比恨永远要强大得多——在挣扎中她甚至把她抱离了地面。德伐日太太用两只手打她,抓她的脸,可是普洛丝小姐只顾低了头搂住她的腰,比怕淹死的女人搂得还紧。

Soon, Madame Defarge's hands ceased to strike, and felt at herencircled waist. "It is under my arm," said Miss Pross, in smotheredtones, "you shall not draw it. I am stronger than you, I blessHeaven for it. I hold you till one or other of us faints or dies!"

德伐日太太马上停止了殴打,伸手往被搂紧的腰间摸去。“你那玩艺儿在我的胳膊下呢,”普洛丝小姐屏住气说,“你休想拔出来。谢谢老天爷,我的力气可比你大。我要一直抱住你,直到我们有一个昏过去或者是死掉!”

Madame Defarge's hands were at her bosom. Miss Pross looked up,saw what it was, struck at it, struck out a flash and a crash, andstood alone- blinded with smoke.

德伐日太太的手己到了胸前。普洛丝小姐抬头一看,认出了那是什么东西,便一拳打了过去,打出了一道闪光、一声巨响,然后便是她一个人站在那里,什么都看不见了。

All this was in a second. As the smoke cleared, leaving an awfulstillness, it passed out on the air, like the soul of the furiouswoman whose body lay lifeless on the ground.

这一切只发生在刹那之间。硝烟散去,只留下可怕的平静。硝烟就像那大发雷霆的妇女的灵魂一样在空气里消散了,那女人的身子却躺在地上,死了。

In the first fright and horror of her situation, Miss Pross passedthe body as far from it as she could, and ran down the stairs tocall for fruitless help. Happily, she bethought herself of theconsequences of what she did, in time to check herself and go back. Itwas dreadful to go in at the door again; but, she did go in, andeven went near it, to get the bonnet and other things that she mustwear. These she put on, out on the staircase, first shutting andlocking the door and taking away the key. She then sat down on thestairs a few moments to breathe and to cry, and then got up andhurried away.

普洛丝小姐被这情况吓了一跳,怕得要命。她先是往楼下跑,想离那尸体远远的,去找其实找不到的人帮忙。幸好她想起了自己惹下的祸的后果,便赶快停步,跑了回来。她十分害怕重新进屋,可她仍然进去了,而且从尸体身边走过,取出了她必须穿戴的帽子和衣物。她然后下了楼,关了门,上了锁,取下钥匙,又坐在台阶上喘了一会儿气,哭了一会儿,这才站起身来匆匆走掉。

By good fortune she had a veil on her bonnet, or she could hardlyhave gone along the streets without being stopped. By good fortune,too, she was naturally so peculiar in appearance as not to showdisfigurement like any other woman. She needed both advantages, forthe marks of griping fingers were deep in her face, and her hair wastorn, and her dress (hastily composed with unsteady hands) wasclutched and dragged a hundred ways.

幸好她的帽子上垂着面纱,否则她在路上怕是难免受人盘问的。也幸好她天生长相奇特,因此不至于像别的妇女给人衣冠不整的印象。她需要这两个有利条件,因为她头发散乱,脸上留下深深的指甲印,衣服也给东拉西扯弄了个乱七八糟,只用颤抖的手匆忙整理过一下。

In crossing the bridge, she dropped the door key in the river.Arriving at the cathedral some few minutes before her escort, andwaiting there, she thought, what if the key were already taken in anet, what if it were identified, what if the door were opened andthe remains discovered, what if she were stopped at the gate, sentto prison, and charged with murder! In the midst of these flutteringthoughts, the escort appeared, took her in, and took her away.

过桥时她把钥匙扔进了河里。她比她的保镖早几分钟到达大教堂,在等他时她想了许多。若是那钥匙叫渔网网住了会怎么样?若是鉴定出是哪家的钥匙会怎么样?若是门打开,发现了尸体会怎么样?若是在城门自把她扣留下来,送进监狱,判她杀人罪又会怎么样?她正在满脑子胡思乱想,她的保镖来了,让她上了车,把她带走了。

"Is there any noise in the streets?" she asked him.

“街上有闹声没有?”她问他。

"The usual noises," Mr. Cruncher replied; and looked surprised bythe question and by her aspect.

“有日常的闹声,”克朗彻先生回答,他因为这个问题和她那副怪像露出一脸惊讶。

"I don't hear you," said Miss Pross. "What do you say?"

“你的话我没听见,”普洛丝小姐说,“你说的是什么?”

It was in vain for Mr. Cruncher to repeat what he said; Miss Prosscould not hear him. "So I'll nod my head," thought Mr. Cruncher,amazed, "at all events she'll see that." And she did.

克朗彻先生重复了他的回答,可那也没有用,普洛丝小姐仍然听不见。“那我就点头吧,”克朗彻先生大吃一惊,想道。“这她无论如何是懂得的。”她倒是懂的。

"Is there any noise in the streets now?" asked Miss Pross again,presently.

“街上现在有闹声没有?”普洛丝小姐不久又问。

Again Mr. Cruncher nodded his head.

克朗彻先生义点了点头。

"I don't hear it."

“可我没听见。”

"Gone deaf in an hour?" said Mr. Cruncher, ruminating, with his mindmuch disturbed; "wot's come to her?"

“才一个小时耳朵怎么就聋了?”克朗彻先生寻思,心里很着急。“她出了什么事了?”

"I feel," said Miss Pross, "as if there had been a flash and acrash, and that crash was the last thing I should ever hear in thislife."

“我觉得,”普洛丝小姐说,“好像火光一闪,又砰的一声,那一声就成了我这一辈子听见的最后一声了。”

"Blest if she ain't in a queer condition!" said Mr. Cruncher, moreand more disturbed. "Wot can she have been a takin', to keep hercourage up? Hark! There's the roll of them dreadful carts! You canhear that, miss?"

“她这个样子可真奇怪!”克朗彻先生越来越紧张,“她喝了什么玩艺儿给自己壮胆了么?听!那吓人的囚车在隆隆地响!你听见车声了没有,小姐?”

"I can hear," said Miss Pross, seeing that he spoke to her,"nothing. O, my good man, there was first a great crash, and then agreat stillness, and that stillness seems to be fixed andunchangeable, never to be broken any more as long as my life lasts."

“一点儿也没听见,”普洛丝小姐见他说话便回答。“啊,我的好人,先是一声砰,声音大极了,然后就没有声音了,再也没有声音了,永远没有了,我这一辈子怕是再也听不见声音了。”

"If she don't hear the roll of those dreadful carts, now very nightheir journey's end," said Mr. Cruncher, glancing over his shoulder,"it's my opinion that indeed she never will hear anything else in thisworld."

既然她连那些可怕的四车的轰隆声都听不见,——囚车,快到目的地了,”克朗彻先生掉过头看了一眼说,“我看她确实是再也听不见这世界上的声音了。”

And indeed she never did.

她确实是再也听不见了。