Far from the madding crowd  远离尘嚣

‘She can't manage the farm alone,’replied Jacob,‘and she won't listen to our advice. Proud,she is. I've often said it,’

“没有农场经理,她怎么办呢?”年老的酒店老板问年轻的人们。

‘You have,Jacob,you have,that's true,’agreed little Joseph Poorgrass.

“她一个人搞不好农场,”雅各布说,“她不听我们的劝告。我总说,她很骄傲。”

‘But she's intelligent,’said Billy Smallbury,‘and must have some common sense. ’

“你是这样说的,雅各布,你是这样说的,你说得对,”矮小的约瑟夫·普格拉斯赞同地说。

‘It seems her old uncle's furniture wasn't good enough for her,’said the maltster‘I hear she's bought new beds,chairs and a piano!If she's a farmer,why does she want a piano? ’

“可是她很聪明,”比利·斯摩伯里说,“她一定很有见识。”

Just then they heard a heavy footstep outside,and a voice called,‘Neighbours,can I bring a few lambs in there?’

“好像她对她年老的叔叔的家具不满意,”酒店老板说。“听说她买了新床、新椅子,还有一架钢琴!如果她要当农场主,她干吗要钢琴呢?”

‘Of course,shepherd,’they all replied.

就在这时,他们听到门外重重的脚步声,一个声音喊道,“乡亲们,我可以把这几只羊羔带进去吗?”

Gabriel appeared in the doorway,his cheeks red and his healthy face shining. On his shoulders were four half-dead lambs,which he put down carefully,close to the fire.

“当然可以,牧羊人,”他们一起答道。

‘I haven't got a shepherd's hut here,as I used to have at Norcombe,’he explained. ‘These new lambs would die if I couldn't keep them warm for a while. It's very kind of you,maltster,to let me bring them in here. ’

盖伯瑞尔出现在门口,他两颊通红,健康的脸庞放着光。在他的肩上有四只半死的羊羔,他小心翼翼地把它们放在靠近火的地方。

‘We've been talking of the mistress,and her strange behaviour,shepherd,’said the maltster.

“我在这儿没有牧羊人小屋,过去在诺科姆我有一个,”他解释说。“如果不让这几只新生的羊羔暖和一会儿,他们会死的。老板,你让我把它们带进来,真是太感谢你了。”

‘What have you been saying about her?’asked Gabriel sharply,turning to the others. ‘I suppose you've been speak- ing against her?’he added angrily to Joseph Poorgrass.

“牧羊人,我们正在谈论女主人以及她的不寻常的所作所为,”酒店老板说。

‘No,no,not a word,’said Joseph,trembling and blushing with terror.

“你们在说她什么呢?”盖伯瑞尔转向众人厉声问。“我想你们是在说她的坏话吧?”他对着约瑟夫·普格拉斯,生气地又问了一句。

‘well,look here,neighbours. ’Gabriel,although normally one of the quietest and most gentle men on earth,had sudden-ly become aggressive. ‘The first man I hear saying anything bad about our mistress will receive this in his face,’and he banged his great heavy hand down on the maltster's table.

“没有,没有,一句坏话也没说。”约瑟夫说。由于害怕颤抖起来,脸也涨红了。

‘Now don't get so angry,shepherd,and sit down!’said Jacob.

“哼,告诉你们,邻居们,”盖伯瑞尔,这个世上最安静、最温柔的人,突然变得咄咄逼人。“我要是听到谁说女主人的坏话,他的脸上首先就会尝到这个,”接着他把他的大手重重地击在了酒店老板的桌子上。

‘We hear you're a very clever man,shepherd,’added Joseph Poorgrass from behind the maltster's bed,where he had been hiding. ‘We all wish we were as clever as you,don't we,neighbours?’There was general agreement.

“牧羊人,别生气,坐下!”雅各布说。

‘I think mistress ought to have made you her farm manager,you're so suitable for the job,’continued Joseph. He could see that Gabriel was no longer angry.

“牧羊人,我们听说你是个很聪明的人,”约瑟夫·普格拉斯从酒店老板的床后边接口说,他一直躲在那儿。“我们都希望我们像你一样聪明,是吧,邻居们?”人们都表示同意。

‘I don't mind confessing I was hoping to be her farm man- ager,’said Gabriel in his honest way. ‘But Miss Everdene can do as she likes,and she's chosen to manage her own farm—and keep me as an ordinary shepherd only. ’He sounded rather depressed,and looked sadly into the fire.

“我认为女主人应该让你当她的农场经理,你太适合干这个工作了,”约瑟夫接着说。他能看出盖伯瑞尔已不生气了。

Before anyone could reply,the door opened and Mr Bold- wood came in. He greeted them all and handed the letter to Gabriel.

“我可以坦白我很希望给她当农场经理,”盖伯瑞尔诚实地说。“不过,伊芙丁小姐有权做自己愿做的事情,她已决定要自己管理农场,而只要我做个普通的牧羊人。”听起来他很沮丧,眼睛悲伤地盯着火。

‘I opened this by mistake,Oak,’he said,‘but it must be for you. I'm sorry. ’

别人正要答话,门开了,伯德伍德走了进来。他和大家打过招呼,把信递给了盖伯瑞尔。

‘Oh,it doesn't matter at all,’answered Gabriel,who had no secrets from anyone. He read this letter:

“奥克,我开错了信,”他说,“这信一定是给你的。我很抱歉。”

Dear friend,

“咳,没关系,”盖伯瑞尔对谁也没有要保密的,说着,他看起信来:

I don't know your name,but I want to thank you for your kindness to me on the night I left Weatherbury. I'm also returning the money you gave me. I'm happy to say I'm going to marry the young man who has been courting me, Sergeant Troy. As he is a nobleman's son,I know he wouldn't like me to accept a gift from anyone. Please don't tell anyone about my marriage. We intend to surprise Weatherbury by arriuing there as husband and wife,very soon. Thank you again.

亲爱的朋友,

Fanny Robin.

我不知道你的名字,但我想谢谢你,因为在我离开威瑟伯里的那天夜里,你对我非常好。我也想把你给我的钱还给你。我很高兴地告诉你,我就要与追求我的年轻人托伊中士结婚了。他是一个贵族的儿子,我知道他不喜欢我接受别人的礼物。请不要告诉别人我结婚的事。我们打算不久将以夫妻的身份出现在威瑟伯里,让人们大吃一惊。再一次的感谢你。

‘You'd better read it,Mr Boldwood,’said Gabriel. ‘It's from Fanny Robin. She wants to keep this a secret but I know you're interested in her. I met her on my way to Weather- bury,but I didn't know then who she was. ’ When Mr Boldwood had finished reading the letter,he looked very serious. ‘Poor Fanny!’he said. ‘I don't think this Sergeant Troy will ever marry her. He's clever,and handsome,but he can't be trusted. What a silly girl Fanny is!’

范妮·罗宾

‘I'm very sorry to hear that,’said Gabriel.

“你最好读一读这封信,伯德伍德先生,”盖伯瑞尔说。“是范妮·罗宾写来的。她不想让别人知道,可我知道你很关心她。我在来威瑟伯里的路上碰到了她,那时我不知道她是谁。”

‘By the way,Oak,’said Mr Boldwood quietly,as he and the shepherd left the malthouse together,‘could you tell me whose writing this is?’He showed Gabriel the envelope containing the valentine.

伯德伍德看完信后,脸上的表情很严肃。“可怜的范妮!”他说。“我认为这个托伊中士不会和她结婚。他聪明英俊,但无法让人信赖。范妮是个多么傻的姑娘啊!”

Gabriel looked at it,and said simply,‘Miss Everdene’s. ’Then he realized that Bathsheba must have written to Mr Boldwood without signing her name,and he looked,puzzled, at the farmer.

“听你这么说我很难过,”盖伯瑞尔说。

Mr Boldwood replied rather too quickly to Gabriel's unspo- ken question. ‘It's quite normal to try to discover who has written the——valentine. That's the——fun of it. ’There was no fun at all in his manner. ‘Goodbye,Oak,’he added,and walked slowly back to his empty house.

“顺便问一下,奥克,”伯德伍德和牧羊人一同离开酒店时,他平静地说,“你能告诉我这是谁的字迹吗?”他让盖伯瑞尔看那个装着情人卡的信封。

A few days later,in the town north of Weatherbury where the soldiers were staying,a wedding was arranged As the church clock in the square struck half-past eleven,a handsome young soldier marched into the church and spoke to the vicar Then he stood still in the centre of the church,waiting for his bride. The church was full of the women and girls who had at- tended the morning service and had decided to wait to see the wedding. They watched the young man's straight back,whis- pering among themselves. The soldier waited without moving a muscle. The church clock struck a quarter to twelve,and still the bride did not come. The whispers stopped,and there was silence. The young man stood as stiff and straight as the church columns around him. There was a little quiet laughter from some of the women,but soon they were silent again,waiting for the end.

盖伯瑞尔看了看信封,只是说,“伊芙丁小姐的字迹。”随后他意识到芭丝谢芭一定是给伯德伍德先生写了一封没有署名的信。他迷惑不解地看着这位农场主。

As the church clock struck twelve,they listened to the heavy notes ringing out from the church tower. The vicar left his position near the soldier,and disappeared into a back room. Every woman in the church was waiting to see the young man's face,and he knew it. At last he turned,and marched bravely back the way he had come,through the rows of smiling women.

盖伯瑞尔的问题还没出口,伯德伍德先生就抢着回答说,“想弄清楚是谁写的情人卡是很正常的,这就是乐趣。”他的态度却没有显示出任何乐趣。“再见,奥克,”他说着慢慢走回了他的空屋子。

When he got outside and crossed the square,he met a girl hurrying towards the church. When she saw him,the anxiety on her face changed to terror.

几天后,在士兵们驻扎的威瑟伯里以北的一个镇上,一场婚礼正在筹备之中。广场上教堂的钟在十一点半敲响时,一个年轻英俊的士兵向教堂走去,他向牧师讲明了情况,然后静静地站在教堂中央,等待着他的新娘。教堂里满是参加早祷的女人和姑娘们,她们想等着看婚礼。她们望着年轻人笔直的后背,悄声议论着。这个士兵一动不动地等待着。教堂十二点差一刻的钟声敲响了,新娘还是没有到。窃窃私语声停止了,教堂里寂静无声。那个年轻人僵直地站着,就像他身边教堂里的柱子。有些女人发出低低的笑声,但她们很快就又安静了下来,等待着最后的结果。

‘Well’?’he said,staring coldly at her.

教堂的钟声敲响了十二点,人们听到教堂塔顶传出低沉的音调。牧师从位于士兵身旁的他的位置上离开,走进了后房。那个年轻人知道教堂中所有的女人都在等着看他脸上的表情。终于,他转过身来,穿过一排排面带讥笑的女人,勇敢地从来的路上走了回去。

‘Oh Frank,I made a mistake!I thought it was the other church,he one near the market,and I waited there till a quarter to twelve,and then I realized my mistake. But it doesn't matter,because we can just as easily get married tomorrow. ’

出了教堂,穿过广场时,他碰上一个急急忙忙往教堂赶来的姑娘。她看到他时,脸上的焦急变成了恐惧。

‘You're a fool,to play games with me!’he replied angrily.

“好啊?”他瞪着她冷冷地说。

‘So shall we get married tomorrow,Frank?’she asked,not understanding how seriously she had offended him. ‘Tomorrow!’he repeated,and laughed. ‘I don't want another experience like that for a while,I can promise you!’

“唉,弗兰克,我弄错了。我以为是另一个教堂,是靠近集市的那个教堂,我在那儿一直等到差一刻十二点,后来意识到我搞错了。不过,没关系。明天我们也能一样容易地结婚。”

‘But Frank,’she begged in a trembling voice,‘it wasn't such a terrible mistake!Now,dear Frank,when will our wedding be?’

“你真蠢,跟我玩这种游戏!”他生气地答道。

‘Ah,when?God knows!’he said,and turning away from her,walked rapidly away.

“弗兰克,那我们明天结婚吗?”她问道,并不明白她已惹怒了他。

“明天!”他重复说,大笑起来。“告诉你,我可不想再要一次这样的经历!”

“可是,弗兰克,”她用颤抖的声音恳求说,“这也不是什么大不了的错!亲爱的弗兰克,我们什么时候举行婚礼?”