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大学生活总结:一个大学生成功的十大秘诀!

kira86 于2009-02-26发布 l 已有人阅读

一个在大学创造了三个学期修完双学位的大学生的成功秘诀!

after writing the time management article “do it now,” which was based on my experience of graduating college in three semesters with two degrees, i received many follow-up questions from students asking for more advice. here are 10 tips to help you create a productive and memorable college experience… and most of all, to deeply enjoy this time in your life.

1. answer the question, “why am i going to college?”

many college students really don’t have a clear reason for being there other than the fact that they don’t know what else to do yet. they inherit goals from family and peers which aren’t truly their own. that was how i started college. is this you as well?

as i’ve stated previously on this blog, the three-semester deal wasn’t my first time at college. i had previously gone to college when i wasn’t in the right frame of mind to be there. in high school i was a straight-a honors student, president of the math club, and captain of the academic decathlon team. that momentum carried me forward, and without really ever deciding if it was what i wanted, i found myself with four more years of school ahead of me. it seemed like a good idea at the time, but my heart just wasn’t in it. consequently, i sabotaged myself in a big way. i blew off my classes and got an education in parties and alcohol. apparently some administrator was biased against students whose gpa starts with a decimal point, so i was soon expelled.

that experience sent me into a bit of a tailspin. i was in a funk for about six months, mostly just playing video games. finally in an attempt to re-ground myself, i got a retail sales job and tried to stay under the radar while taking some time to “find myself.” that was the time i began developing an interest in personal development, and boy did it pay off. a year later i was ready to go back to college, and i started over as a freshman. but this time i knew why i was there. i wanted to be a programmer, and i wanted to earn my computer science degree (i later added the math degree). but it was more than that. i knew i was capable of a lot more, and i wanted to push myself. i wanted to create the richest experience i could. for me that meant a really dense schedule.

your goals for college will likely be different than mine. what are they? why are you there? if you don’t know — and i mean really know it in your gut — then you have no focal point for your experience. you may as well not even be there. what is it about your experience that resonates as true for you? what are you there to learn? what do you want to experience?

2. imagine your ideal college experience.

once you know why you’re going to college, imagine your ideal outcome. let it flow outward from the reason you’re there. whether you’ve already started college or not, stop and simply write down some attributes of your ideal experience. describe it in as much detail as you can.

before i returned to school, i spent hours visualizing the kind of experience i wanted to have. i saw myself being challenged but managing it easily and without stress. i saw myself making new friends. i saw myself having a really great time. most of all i imagined a very balanced experience — a blend of academics, activities, socialization, and fun. the keyword i used was “richness.”

this was a really important step. i didn’t understand the mechanism at the time, but i was pre-programming myself to succeed. whenever i encountered obstacles, my ideal vision was so much more compelling that i was always able to find a way to get what i wanted. i became a co-creator of my experience instead of a passive victim of it.

visualization allows you to make mistakes in advance. if you can’t get a clear visualization, your experience is likely to be just as fuzzy. debug your visualization until it inspires you.

real life will of course turn out differently than you visualize. the point of visualization isn’t to predict the future or to restrict your freedom to decide later. the point is to give you more clarity for making decisions right now. your ideal scene serves as a map that can guide you through the quagmire of options.

3. take at least one extra class each semester.

students are taught that 12-15 semester units (3-5 classes) is a “full” schedule. but a schedule that light is hardly full. a person with a full-time job will put in a good 40+ hours per week, and students enjoy every possible vacation day plus spring break, winter break, and summer vacation. if you want to spend four or more years in college, add more degrees or get a job on the side. don’t feel you have to go at a snail’s pace just because everyone else does.

now you might be thinking that 12-15 units are supposed to equate to a 40-hour week with all the outside homework and studying, but that’s only going to happen if you do things very inefficiently (which sadly is what most people do). if you follow some of the time-saving tips later in this article, then 15 units should only require a few additional hours outside of class to complete assignments. obviously i couldn’t have taken 31-39 units per semester if it meant doing double those hours in outside homework. i didn’t succeed by overworking myself.

if you’re an above average student, you can certainly handle an above average schedule. sometimes we don’t know what we can handle until we push ourselves a little. if you think you can handle 15 units, take 18 or 21. you can easily shave a year off your schedule. or you may be able to add a minor or a double major.

what about prerequisites? for the most part i simply ignored them, and fortunately at my school they weren’t enforced too well. i found that most of the time a prerequisite is listed, it’s geared towards below average students. don’t let pointless bureaucracy slow you down if you want to graduate sooner. there’s always a way around it — it’s usually just a matter of getting some random form signed by someone who’s too bored to care either way. a smile and a compliment go a long way.

by the law of forced efficiency, if you put more things on your plate, you’ll find a way to get them done with the time you have available. so if you don’t challenge yourself a little, that extra time will slip through your fingers.

i think the real benefit to a dense schedule isn’t that you’ll graduate sooner. the real benefit is that you’ll enjoy a richer experience. taking five classes instead of four means more learning, more achievement, and more friends. and what employer wouldn’t be attracted to a student who graduated more quickly than his/her peers? this sort of thing sure looks great on a resume.

4. set clear goals for each class.

decide what you want out of each specific class. is this a subject you’re eager to learn? do you want to target this teacher for a letter of recommendation? is this a required class you must take but which doesn’t otherwise interest you?

my goals for each class determined how often i would show up, whether i’d sit in the front or the back, how actively i’d participate, and what kind of relationship i’d seek to establish with the teacher.

for some classes i wanted to master the material. for others i just wanted an a grade. and for others i wanted to set myself up for glowing letters of recommendations from enthusiastic teachers whose native language was english (so the letters would be highly readable and positive).

my mom has been a college math professor for decades. at home she’d comment about students she barely knew who’d ask her for letters of recommendation. many times she had to turn them down because she just didn’t have anything positive to say in the letter. on the other hand, she was happy to support those students who put in a serious effort. most teachers want to help you, but you have to let them see your strengths. even if you don’t get an a in a particular class, you can still give a teacher plenty of material for a great letter of recommendation if you participate actively and show respect toward the teacher.

this is not about manipulating your professors into lying on your behalf. the simple truth is that the quality of a letter of recommendation ultimately comes down to how much a teacher respects you. don’t put yourself in the desperate situation of having to request a letter of recommendation from a teacher who doesn’t even remember you — or worse, one who thinks poorly of you. set yourself up for success in advance.

one of my professors learned about my packed academic schedule and expressed interest in learning how i was managing it. we had a very nice conversation about time management techniques. i had several programming classes with this professor and aced them all. i happened to think he was an excellent teacher, i had great respect for him, and i quite enjoyed his classes. when it came time to ask him for a letter of recommendation, he wrote one of the most glowing letters imaginable (”best student i’ve encountered in my career,” etc.).

on the other hand, i had certain teachers who were downright lousy. i ditched their classes often and learned the material from the textbook. obviously i didn’t seek out their assistance down the road.

sometimes you’ll achieve your goals; sometimes you won’t. even if you do your best, you may still fall short. you may encounter teachers that are unfair, lazy, sexist, racist, or otherwise incompetent. my wife had an overtly sexist professor who would never give a female student a grade higher than a b, no matter how well she did. he would say things like, “if you’re a male, you’ll have to work hard in this class. if you’re a female, just come by my office after hours.” eventually sexual harrassment charges were filed against him. you’ll have to pick your battles. some are worth fighting; others are best ignored. having clear goals will help you decide which is which.

5. triage ruthlessly.

you don’t need to put an equal amount of effort into every class. inject extra effort when it’s important to you, but feel free to back off a little from classes that are a low priority based on your specific goals. for me this was an important way to conserve energy. i couldn’t play full out in every class, or i’d burn out, so i invested my energy where it mattered most.

in every student’s schedule, some classes are critical while others are almost trivial. in a typical week, i’d usually ditch around 40% of my classes because i just didn’t need to be there. for some classes attendance was necessary, but for others it didn’t make much difference. i could simply get the notes from another student if needed, or i could learn the material from the textbook. if it wasn’t necessary for me to attend a particular class (based on my goals for that class), i usually ditched it. that saved me a lot of time and kept me from having to sit in class all day long. sometimes i’d just grab some food with friends to give myself an extra break.

i would also triage individual assignments. if i felt an assignment was lame, pointless, or unnecessarily tedious, and if it wouldn’t have too negative an impact on my grade, i would actually decline to do it. one time i was assigned a tedious paper that represented 10% of my grade. i really didn’t want to do it, and it required a lot more hours than i felt it was worth. i was headed for an a in the class, and if i didn’t do this assignment, i’d drop to an a-. so i respectfully told the professor i was declining the assignment and that i thought it was a fair trade to receive an a- in order to reinvest those hours elsewhere. he already knew me and understood my reasons. he gave me an a-, and i was fine with that. it was indeed a fair trade. in fact, looking back i wish i’d done this sort of thing more often.

sometimes teachers get a little too homework happy and dole out assignments that really don’t justify the effort. you’re in charge of your academic experience though, not your teachers. don’t feel you must do every assignment just because the teacher feels it’s a good idea. you be the judge in accordance with your own reasons for being there. just be sure to consider the consequences of your decision.

by stealing time from low priority assignments, i was able to invest more time in the real gems. some creative assignments taught me a great deal. i usually hated group projects with a passion, but there was one particular group project where the team really gelled. i enjoyed it tremendously and learned a lot from it.

a cool triage technique i used was timeboxing. i would decide how much time an assignment warranted, and then i’d do the best job i could within the allotted time. so if i had to write a 10-page research page on european history, i might devote 8 hours to it total. i’d slice up the 8 hours into topic selection, planning, library research, outlining, writing, and editing, and then i’d do my best to stay within those times. this was a great way to keep me from overengineering an assignment that didn’t need it.

in a way this was my own method of academic load balancing. some of your assignments will be unbalanced in the sense that they seem to require an unreasonable amount of effort compared to how much of your grade they represent or how much you expect to benefit from completing them. sometimes i would decide that the effort to write an a-paper just wasn’t warranted. maybe i’d estimate it would take me 20 hours to do an a job but only 10 hours to do a b job. and if the assignment was only 10% of my grade, perhaps i could accept a b there. i often thought in this machiavellian fashion back then, and often to my surprise i found that my b-quality papers would come back with as anyway.

6. get an early start to each day.

i’ve written previously about the benefits of becoming an early riser. i wasn’t getting up at 5am when i was in college, but i’d usually get up around 6-7am. i found that getting an early start each day helped me get a lot more done, not just in the morning but throughout the day. i began each day with a 25-minute run followed by a shower and breakfast. this simple morning routine got me out the door feeling alert and energized.

i’d be lying if i said i got up early because i wanted to. it was really out of necessity. i had many morning classes, including 7:30am classes one semester. but i’m glad i did that because if i didn’t have those morning classes, i just would have slept more than i needed to. even if you hate morning classes, you may find as i did that you’re a lot more productive if you schedule them anyway.

7. reclaim wasted time during your classes.

let’s face it. not every class is going to require your utmost concentration. sometimes teachers babble. sometimes they reiterate what you already know. what percentage of class time requires your complete, focused attention? for some classes it’s 90%. for others it’s 20%. if you aren’t actively learning during class, you’re wasting time. if a class is really challenging, sit in the front and soak up every word. but if a class isn’t challenging you, then sit in the back, do homework for other classes, and pop your head up every once in a while to see if there’s anything worth jotting down. always have a book open, so when your hippie professor goes off on yet another nostalgia trip about the 60s, you’ll have something productive to do.

this was a surprisingly great cure for boredom. if the professor was droning on and putting everyone to sleep, i’d be working on programming assignments. i used to write them out on paper and then go to the computer lab between classes and type them up. that way i didn’t have to spend much time outside class in the lab, sometimes just 10-15 minutes if my program worked the first time.

you’ll be amazed at how much time you can free up using this method. i was able to complete the bulk of my assignments in class (but usually not in the classes in which the tasks were assigned). if you’re in school right now, i challenge you to see how much extra homework you can complete during your normal class time today. then estimate how many hours you’ll save every week from this practice. it really adds up.

you can’t concentrate at peak efficiency continuously, so be sure to take breaks. when you need a break though, take a real break. i used to meditate or nap on the grass between classes in order to recharge myself. i’d use my wristwatch alarm to signal when it was time to get up and go again. those breaks were very restorative, and i could go to the next class and work full out once again. i never worked flat out all day long. i worked in waves between total concentration and total relaxation, cycling many times per day.

8. learn material the very first time it’s presented.

one of the biggest time wasters in school is having to relearn something you didn’t learn properly the first time. when students say they’re studying, most of the time they’re making up for a previous failure to learn the material.

in software development it’s well known that bugs should be fixed as soon as possible after they’re introduced. waiting to fix a bug near the end of a project can take 50x as much effort as it would take to fix the bug the first time it was noticed. failing to learn what you’re supposedly taught each day is a serious bug. don’t try to pile new material on top of an unstable foundation, since it will take even more time to rebuild it later.

if you don’t understand something you were taught in class today, treat it as a bug that must be fixed asap. do not put it off. do not pile new material on top of it. if you don’t understand a word, a concept, or a lesson, then drop everything and do whatever it takes to learn it before you continue on. ask questions in class, get a fellow student to explain it to you, read and re-read the textbook, and/or visit the professor during office hours, but learn it no matter what.

i was normally an ace in math, perhaps because my mother is a college math professor who was taking calculus classes while i was in the womb. plus my father was an aerospace engineer, so i’ve certainly got the genes for it. but there were a couple topics i found incomprehensible when they were first introduced: eigenvalues and eigenvectors. i’m a highly visual learner, which is normally a strength academically, but i found these abstract concepts difficult to visualize. many of my classmates found them confusing too. i invested the extra effort required to grasp these concepts and earned an a in the class because i treated my confusion as a bug that had to be fixed immediately. those students who allowed their confusion to linger found themselves becoming more and more lost as the course progressed, and cramming at the end couldn’t bestow complete comprehension. just like programming bugs, confusion multiplies if left untreated, so stamp it out as early as possible. if you’re confused about anything you’re being taught, you’ve got a bug that needs fixing. don’t move on until you can honestly say to yourself, “yes, i understand that… what’s next?”

ideally there should be no need to study outside of class, at least in the sense of relearning material you didn’t learn the first time. you can review old material to refresh your memory, but you shouldn’t have to devote a minute of your time to learning something that was taught a month or two earlier.

during finals i was probably the least-stressed student of all. i didn’t have to study because by the time the final exam came up, in my mind the course was already over. the test was just a formality. while everyone else was cramming, i’d be at the arcade playing video games. i’d already learned the material and completed all the assignments (at least the ones i was going to complete). at most i’d just spend some time reviewing my notes to refresh the material the night before the test. isn’t this how academic learning is supposed to work? otherwise what’s the point of showing up to class for an entire semester?

during each semester ask yourself this question: am i ready to be tested right now on everything that has been taught up to this point? if your answer is ever “no,” then you know you’re falling behind, and you need to catch up immediately. ideally you should be able to answer “yes” to this question at least once a week for every subject.

falling behind even a little is an enormous stressor and time waster. first, you have to go back and re-learn the old material when the rest of the class has already moved on. secondly, you may not learn the new material as well if it builds on the old material because you lack a solid foundation, so you just end up falling further and further behind. then when you come to the end of the semester, you end up having to re-learn everything you were supposed to learn. but because you cram at the last minute, after finals you forget everything anyway. what’s the point of that silliness? it’s like overspending on a credit card that charges you 25% interest. eventually you’ll have to pay up, and it will cost you a lot more time in the long run.

put in the effort to learn your material well enough to get as in all your classes. it will pay off. much of the material you learn will build on earlier material. if you get as in your freshman courses, you’ll be well prepared to pile on new material in your sophomore year. but if you get cs that first year, you’re already going into your second year with an unstable foundation, making it that much harder to bring your grades up and really master the material. make straight as your goal every semester. in the long run, it’s much easier. i found that c students tended to work a lot harder than i did, especially in their junior and senior years, because they were always playing catch up. despite my packed schedule, it wasn’t stressful for me because i kept on top of every subject. consequently, i had plenty of time for fun while other students experienced lots of stress because they constantly felt unprepared.

9. master advanced memory techniques.

one of the keys to learning material the first time it’s taught is to train yourself in advanced memory techniques. i used them often in classes that required rote memorization of certain facts, including names, dates, and mathematical formulas. if a teacher wrote something on the board that had to be memorized verbatim for an upcoming exam, i’d memorize it then and there. then i wouldn’t have to go back and study it later.

i’m sure you’ve encountered simple mnemonic techniques such as using the phrase “every good boy does fine” to memorize the musical notes e, g, b, d, and f. those kinds of tricks work well in certain situations, but they’re so grammar school. there are far more efficient visual techniques. the two i relied on most in school were chaining and pegging.

it’s beyond the scope of this article to explain these techniques in detail, but you can simply visit this site to learn all about them. or you can pick up a book on memory improvement, such as the memory book by harry lorayne. i recommend learning from a book because then you’ll build a solid foundation step by step.

these techniques will allow you to memorize information very rapidly. for example, with pegging i could usually memorize a list of 20 items in about 90 seconds with perfect recall even weeks later. experts at this are faster. anyone can do it — it’s just a matter of training yourself.

i still use these techniques today. chaining allows me to memorize my speeches visually. when i give a speech, my imagination runs through the visual movie i’ve created while i select words on the fly to fit the images. it’s like narrating a movie. my speech isn’t memorized word for word, so it sounds natural and spontaneous and can be adapted on the fly to fit the situation. memorizing visually is much faster and more robust than trying to memorize words. if you memorize a speech word for word and forget a line, it can really throw you off. but with a series of images, it’s easier to jump ahead to the next frame if you make a mistake. our brains are better suited to visualize memorization than phonetic memorization.

i don’t recommend memorizing by repetition because it’s way too slow. pegging and chaining do not require repetition — they allow you to imbed strong memories on a single pass, usually in seconds. the downside is that pegging and chaining require a lot of up-front practice to master, but once you learn them, these are valuable skills you’ll have for life. i also found that learning these techniques seemed to improve my memory as a whole, even when i’m not actively trying to memorize. i think this practice trained my subconscious to store and recall information more effectively.

it’s a shame these techniques aren’t normally taught in school. they would save students an enormous amount of time. do yourself a favor and learn them while you’re young. they have a lot of practical applications, including remembering people’s names.

10. have some serious fun!

challenge yourself academically, but give yourself plenty of time for fun as well. don’t squander your leisure time hanging around doing nothing. go out and do something active that will blow off steam and increase your energy.

one of my favorite college leisure activities was frisbee golf (also called disc golf). i used to play for hours at night with a couple friends, sometimes until my fingers became blistered… or until campus security gave us the boot for hitting one too many non-player students. :)

while playing frisbee golf, we would often have to scavenge through bushes, wade through fountains, and climb over various hazards trying to recover errant frisbees. it was always lots of fun, and we’d usually “play through” these obstacles. several hours of frisbee golf served as a delightful reward at the end of a challenging week. i still remember an incredible “hole in one” shot i made from a second-story balcony to hit a light post at the edge of a soccer field.

my biggest regret about college is that i didn’t have a girlfriend during that time. if i had it to do all over again, i probably would have added an extra semester and taken fewer classes to make time for that someone special. i had the opportunity, but i had to pass it up because my schedule was too packed. girlfriends can be a lot of fun, but most aren’t very efficient. ;)

this article’s advice centers on making your college experience as rich and memorable as possible. get your school work done quickly and efficiently, so you have plenty of time for the variety of activities college can offer. join clubs. play frisbee golf. get a boyfriend or girlfriend. the worst thing you can do is spend your time falling behind academically due to poor habits, feeling stressed and unprepared all the time, and then playing catch up. squeeze as much juice out of college as you can, and let it serve as a springboard to a lifetime of fulfillment.

people often assume my aggressive schedule must have been stressful and exhausting, but the irony is that it was just the opposite. i seemed to have an easier, more enjoyable experience than my peers. students with lighter schedules slacked off and fell behind because they convinced themselves they could make up for it later. but i couldn’t afford to do that because it would have been impossible for me to catch up on a dozen different classes… and way too stressful to even think about it. if i fell even a week behind, i’d be in serious trouble. so i was compelled to develop good habits that kept me perpetually relaxed, focused, and energized. many of the habits discussed above were simply the result of setting the goal to graduate in three semesters. that goal dictated the process. i’m very grateful for the experience because it showed me just how much more effective we can be when we push ourselves beyond our comfort zones. it taught me to keep setting goals beyond what i feel certain i can accomplish. many times what we assume to be impossible just isn’t. we only think it is.


 


 

 

在给《时代》杂志写了一篇基于我自己在大学学习了三学期获得了两个学位就毕业了的真是经验的稿件以后,我从想要获得更多建议的大学生朋友们那里得到了更多的问题。因此我自己总结了以下10经验,给你们,希望借此你们能够享受更加富有创造性和记忆深刻的大学生活,更为重要的是,能够尽情的享受这个一生中最为美好的时光。

1.回答自己这样一个问题:“我为什么要上大学?”

许多大学生朋友们对于自己为什么上大学心中都没有一个很明确的概念而不是说不知道自己到底应该做什么。他们从自己的家庭或者同龄人中获得了相同的目标,而这个目标并不是他们自己的。而我就是这样的。你是否也又遇到了相同的情况呢?

在我开始写这个博客之前,我生命中创造的三学期的奇迹并不是我第一次上大学。当我还不是处于上大学的充足准备好的心境的时候我就已经上大学了。在高中的时候,我一直是个全a的学生,数学俱乐部的主席,体育全能十项的队长,这些都是使我前进的动力,并没有决定这是否就是我真正想要的,而且我也并没有为这些做好必要的准备,我发现对于我自己来说,并不是我控制着自己的学业,而是我的学业控制了我。我连跳了四级,在当时看来确实是好事情,但是我的心并不在那里。结果,我走上了一条不归路,旷课逃学,沉迷于聚会玩乐和酗酒。显而易见的,学校的管理人员是依据学分来管理学生的,我很快就被开除了。

这段经历使得我陷入了极大的心里落差当中。整整六个月我都在极度的失意和痛苦中度过,逃避现实,沉迷于电子游戏当中。最终,在一次重塑自己的尝试中,我得到了一份零售员的工作,并且在这段时间中寻找真正的自己。真是这段时间,我发现了自己真正的兴趣所在,那就是人类发展史,而事实证明这是中就有了成效的。一年后,我终于做好了重回大学的准备,而我也作为一个大一新生重新开始一切。但是这次与之前不同的是,我已经明白了我到这里来真正的目的是什么了。我想要成为一名程序员,我想要获得我自己的计算机学士学位(稍后我还加了个数学学士学位)但是我想要的远远不仅仅是这些,我知道自己现在有能力去实现更多的事情,而我也想要激励自己,去成就更多。我想尽我所能的创造属于自己的最丰富的经验。而这些事情对于我来说可真的是个大工程啊!

你在大学的梦想和我的肯定是不尽相同的。这些梦想是什么呢?你为什么会到大学里面来呢?如果你不知道-我是指不是你本能的那种明白的话-那么你的人生经历中就没有了所谓的焦点,那就像是没有上大学一样的。到底是什么样子的经历能够在你的内心产生最真是的深切的共鸣呢?你到大学是为了学习什么的呢?你想要经历些什么呢?

2.在内心中构建你理想的大学生活

一旦你明白了自己到底是为什么上大学的,就在你的内心中构建一下你理想中的大学生活的场景吧。让他直接产生于你来大学的原因中,顺快的产生。不管你是否已经开始你的大学生活,先停下来,罗列出你认为是大学理想生活的事项。描绘的越细致越好。

在我返回学校之前,我花费了好几个钟头用来描绘我心目中的我想要经历的所有事情的美好场景。我仿佛看到了自己面对挑战,但是最终在没有任何压力的情况下努力完成了。我仿佛看到了自己结交了很多的新朋友。我看到自己真正的享受了自己的好时光。最重要的是,我做到了使得我希望做到的一切有条不紊不稳很均衡的进行---学分,活动,社会活动,以及享受生活的有机融合。而我用以总结的关键词就是“富有”。

这真的是十分关键的一步。在那个时候我并不知道什么捷径,但是我提前设计自己走向成功。每当我遇到了障碍的时候,我所描绘的理想的场景就会更加的清晰,而我也终究能够找到一条解决的方法获得我这正想要得到的东西。我成为了我的经验的创造者而不是一个消极的受害者。

当然这种幻想是允许你提前犯错的,如果你不能获得一个清晰的场景的时候,你的经历也变的模糊不清的时候,你可以随时修复你的幻想的知道他能够再次激励你为止。

现实生活和你想象中的事情终究会是不一样的。使得你的梦想形象化并不是为了预测将来或者是限制你未来的某种自由。而是为了让你更加明确的在现在作出决定。你理想的场景就像是地图一样让你走出困住你的现实的沼泽地。

3.每学期至少学一门其他的课程

大学生们每个学期差不多又12-15个单元的课程,每个单元3-5课时,而这些就构成了一个完整的时间表。而这个课程表对于大多数人来说并没有占据了太多的时间。一个全职工作的人每个星期的工作时间是40个小时以上,而大学生则能够享受除了每个可能的假期外还包括包括春假,寒假,暑假。如果你想要在大学带上个四年或者更多的时间,获得更多的学位或者如此同时找个工作的话。不要害怕你的步伐缓慢因为其他的任何人都要这样。

你可能会认为12-15个学时会和一个星期四十个小时以上的学习或者是家务事划等号的,但这种情况仅仅是当你做事情非常没有效率的时候发生的(而事实上是大多数人确实是如此的)。如果你在接下来的小贴士中遵循我提到的一些关于节省时间的方法,这15个单元仅仅就需要你一点点的课余时间来完成你的任务。很显然,我并不会花费31-39个单元的时间,而这意味着我要花费双倍的课外时间来完成我的任务的话,我并不是靠着过度工作来取得成功的。

如果你是个相对优秀的学生的话,那么你就肯定能够解决课程表的问题。有的时候面对困难的时候我们并不知道怎么解决,但是如果我们能够提升自己一下,给自己一点压力的话,问题往往能够迎刃而解的。如果你认为自己能够解决15个单元的话,那么就把任务提升到18-21个,那么你就能轻松的解决你一个学期的课程了。不出意外的话,还能读个双学位呢!

那么先决条件是什么呢?我曾经忽略过这点,但是后来我发现这是十分重要的。不要让没有任何意义的官方政策阻挡住你,如果你想尽快毕业的话。总是会有什么方法解决的,无非就是从一些无聊的人那里弄一些表格填写一下。记住在任何时候微笑都是十分有利的工具!

高压之下出效率这条法则的作用下,如果你把更多的东西放入你的盘子里面的话,你就会发现在你所被允许的时内把因为我他们都消化掉的方法的,随意如果你不想把办法挑战自己的话,那么时间就都悄悄的流走了!

4.为你的每门课程制定一个目标吧!

作出你每个课程想要达到的目标是什么,想想这是不是你非常想要学习的课程呢?你是否会想给教授写一封自己的推荐信呢?这门课是不是你必须学,但是你对他一点都不感兴趣呢?

我针对不同的科目制定的目标决定了我出勤的频率,我上课时是坐在前排还是后面,我在课堂的活跃程度,以及我和这门课程的导师会建立怎么样的关系。

对于有些课程我想要精通。而对于有些课程我仅仅想得到一个a。有些科目我仅仅是想要从教授那里得到一封推荐信罢了。

我的妈妈做了几十年的大学数学教授。她老人家就时常的在家里面评论那些她知道就是赤裸裸的冲着她的推荐信来的学生们。很多时候他只能很直接的就拒绝他们了,因为他根本就不知道这个学生的任何优点,更不要说写封信夸奖他们了。而与此相反,她则很了一帮助那些十分努力的学生们。很多老师都是愿意帮助你的,但是你必须让他们看到你的优势所在。即使你在一些科目中并没有得到a,但是你仍然能够给老师提供充足的推荐信的材料,只要你积极的参与课程,并且对于这些老师表现出了应有的尊敬。

这并不是说操控你的老师为你说话。而真正的事实是推荐信的质量代表了一个老师对于你的尊敬程度。不要让你自己陷入这样的尴尬绝望的处境--不得不让一个甚至都不记得你的老师给你写推荐信,更加糟糕的是,一个对于你印象十分的差劲的老师。记住,提前为了自己的成功做打算!

我的一个导师在得知我的满满当当的课程表的安排的时候,表现了相当大的兴趣,并且想要知道我到底是怎么做到的。我们对于管理技能方面做了一次相当开心的谈话。我的很多编程课程都是跟着他上的,并且我完成的很出色。我认为他是一个十分出色的老师,十分的尊敬他,并且我十分的喜欢他的课程。当我让他为我写一封推荐信的时候,他在心中写下了这么一句十分有分量的话“我的教学生涯中遇到的最好的一位学生!”

而与此同时,我肯定会遇到一些十分糟糕的老师的。对于这样的老师的课程我就经常的逃课,并且从辅导书中学习那些相关的知识。很显然我并没有得到这些老师的任何有用处的帮助。

有的时候你会实现你的目标,而有的时候你不能。即使有的时候你真的竭尽全力了,你仍然会遇到一些小小的挫折。你会遇到形形色色的老师摆明不公平对待的,懒惰的,性别主义者,种族主义者,或者其他的各式各样的。我的妻子就遇到了一个公开的性别主义者,他甚至宣称他从来不会给任何一个女生比b更高的分数,即使他做得再好。他或许会这样说:“如果你是个男人的话,你就必须在这门课上面下工夫,如果你是个女士的话,那就下课后直接来我的办公室好了。”虽然最终他因为性骚扰被解聘。所以有的时候该打的仗就要努力去斗争。有些事情是值得用斗争去争取的,而有些你最好忽略掉。而确定清晰的目标就会帮助你决定到底什么样的事情是应该的,什么样的是不应该的。

5.分工明确

你大可不必每门课程上面都花费同样的时间和经历。对于你重要的学科来说多多花费一些经历,但是对于那些并不是很重要的学科来说就大可不必了。而对于我来说,这条定律就是我节省经历的重要法则。我并不是每门课都是全勤,否则的话我肯定就会崩溃了,我只把我的经历投资在那些对于我来说最重要的东西上面。

对于任何一个大学生来说,有的课程很重要,而有的课程简直就是形同虚设。举个例子,在有的典型的星期中,我会放弃我的40%左右的课程,因为我根本就不需要。对于那些必须要上课,但是却没有任何意义的课程来说,如果需要的话我就从同学那里借笔记,或者自己看辅导书。如果没有特殊必要让我必须去上课的话,我就会旷掉。这就使我有了大量充足的时间,并且不至于每天憋在教室里面听那些无聊的课程了。有时候我就买点小酒小菜的和我的好朋友们聊聊让自己好好休息一下。

我同样会作出不同的针对性安排的。如果我认为一个任务是差劲的,没有任何的意义,单调乏味的,而且并不会对于我的学分产生什么影响的话,我就不会去做他。有一次我们留了个作业,写一篇极度乏味的论文,这篇论文会占我这门功课总成绩的10%。我并不是很想做,但是如果不做的话,我的成绩就会使a-了。所以我就很充满敬意的告诉我的授课老师说我不想做这篇作业,而如果把节省下来的时间去做其他的事情的话是一个更加不错的选择。这个教授知道我的为人处世的方式,并且理解这其中的原因,因此他给了我一个a-,我对此感到十分的满意。这确实是个不错的交易。实施上,回忆一下,我当时是经常做这样的事情的。

6.每天尽早的起床

我上大学的时候不到五点是不会起床的,事实上我基本上是6-7点才会起床。我发现每天早起能够使得我有时间去做更多的事情,不仅仅是在早晨而是这一整天。吃完早餐,洗完澡后,我会慢跑25分钟。这使得我不再神经衰弱,而且更加的又经历了。

我曾曾经即使是说了会起床还是会在创上面躺一会的。但是我在第一学期的时候有一门早上七点半上的课。但是当时我起来了,并且去上课了,我很高兴我做到了,如果没有那门早课的话,我想我永远会睡懒觉的。随意即使你很讨厌早课,还是去上吧,这回帮助你像我一样精力充沛的

7.找回在你课程上被浪费的时间

直面现实吧!并不是所有的科目都需要你极度的注意力。有的老师很差劲。有的时候老师总是反复说你已经记得很清楚的知识点。课堂到底需要你多大程度的注意力呢?有的课程需要90%,而对于另外一些课程来说,仅仅需要20%就够了。如果你在课堂上面并不是很积极的,那么你就是在浪费时间。如果一门课程真的很有挑战性的话,那么就坐在最前排,认真的咀嚼每句话的含义。但是如果一门课并不能吸引你的话,做到后面去吧,做作业。然后是不是的抬抬头看看有没有什么需要你记下来的东西。主意要让你的课本是打开的以防你的教授会突然袭击!

接下来我要告诉大家的是一个很好的无聊的解决方法,如果教授的念咒让每个人昏昏欲睡的话,我会致力于我的编程作业。我经常会在纸上写下他们,然后就在课堂的课间去计算机房把他们在电脑上面输出。用这种方式我并不用花费大量的时间在机房中,有的时候仅仅只需要几分钟就够了。

你一定会对我为什么会用这种方法腾出这么多的时间。我甚至能够在我的课堂时间完成我的大部分作业。(当然并不是在作业倍被布置的那门课上面)如果你现在在学校的话,那么我想让你自己做个挑战,看看你能够在课堂上面完成多少的课堂作业。你将通过这个时间看看自己在一个星期中倒底省下了多少的时间。这个方法真的很有效的!

你不能一刻不停的做工作,那样你会达到一种极限,适当的休息一下。如果你觉得自己累了,那就休息一下。我经常在课后打个盹或者沉思一下以此使得自己重新充满精力。我会用我的手表丁闹钟,告诉我什么时候该起来去上下节课或者重新去工作了。我从来不会整天工作,把自己弄得精疲力尽。我按照自己完全放松和全神贯注的工作之间的周期安排自己的作息时间。

8.在资料现身的第一时间吃透他!

时间最大的浪费就是不得不重新学习已经学过但是没有理解透彻的东西。当一些学生说他们在学习的时候,其实他们是在弥补当初没有学习透彻的漏洞!

在软件的发展过程中,我们知道软件的bug是需要不停的进行修补的。在这个软件工程块要结束的时候修补这个bug所要花费的经历是在这个软件刚刚开发的时候就及时进行修补所需要花费精力的50倍!错过了学习你所被教授的课程和知识就像是一个bug一样。不要在不稳定的根基上面在增加上一些什么其他的东西了,还是先把根基稳住再说吧!

如果你对于今天所学的知识有什么不明白的地方的话,不要把它就这么放下了。也不要再去看什么新的材料,如果你对于一个词汇,一个内容或者一堂课不理解的话,放下其他的一切活,就专心的把这个学好。在课堂上面有什么问题及时的问老师,或者找个你的同学帮助你解答,不断的去重新阅读你的课本,或者去老师的办公室把这些问个明白!

我在数学方面确实很出众,或许因为我妈妈是个大学数学教授,在怀我的时候就开始让我同数学有了亲密的接触了。再加上我爸爸是个航空工程师,我就真的是又遗传基因了。但是在第一次接触特征值和特征向量这两个概念的时候我就是无法理解,我十分的擅长于形象思维,但是这些抽象的东西真的是很难形象化。我的很多同学也同样感到很疑惑。我用我大量的课余时间爱你去搞清楚这些概念,并且尽力去得到一个a,因为我把我的迷惑作为一个软件中小小的bug一样对待。而那些放任自己抑制迷惑的同学呢,发现自己随着课程的深入越来越迷惑了,如果你对于所学的东西有任何还不明白的地方,不要就这么搁置他不管了,而是要一直弄明白为止!

9.学一些速记的技巧

学习新东西的最为重要的一点就是要有一点记忆的小技巧。我经常在需要熟记一些人名或者是时间以及数学公式的时候使用这些小技巧。如果老师在黑板上面写下一些考试的时候必考的内容的话,我会当堂记下,这样的话我就不用花费课余的时间去重新记忆了。

我相信你也遇到过一些记忆的小方法,比如用短语“every good boy does fine ”来记忆单词 e g b d f。这些小把戏在有的时候会很管用,但这仅仅限于小学的语法课罢了。但是还有更加有效的视觉冲击法。

我在学校上学的时候最依赖的两个方法就是连接法和价格变动法。

这两个方法在原文链接的网站提供

10。有一些良好的爱好

不停的给自己挑战的同时,别忘了自己要找点乐子。不要把自己的时间浪费在带着不做任何事情上面,有事没事的出去逛逛,缓解一下压力,并且还能使得自己经历充沛。

我在大学最喜欢的就是保龄球,我经常好几个小时的打,有的时候手都起泡了。

我在大学时最大的遗憾就是没有搞对象。如果给我个机会把一切重来的话,我将会选择在学校多带一个学期或者更久,找到那个适合我的人。曾经有一份真挚的爱情摆在我面前,但是我没有珍惜,都是被我那个慢慢的课程表搞得!

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