Sense and Sensibility  理智与情感

When breakfast was over she walked out by herself, and wandered aboutthe village of Allenham, indulging the recollection of past enjoymentand crying over the present reverse for the chief of the morning.

  早饭过后,她独自走出家门,到艾伦汉村盘桓了大半个上午,一面沉耀于往日的欢乐,一面为目前的不幸而悲泣。

The evening passed off in the equal indulgence of feeling. She playedover every favourite song that she had been used to play to Willoughby,every air in which their voices had been oftenest joined, and sat atthe instrument gazing on every line of music that he had written outfor her, till her heart was so heavy that no farther sadness could begained; and this nourishment of grief was every day applied. She spentwhole hours at the pianoforte alternately singing and crying; her voiceoften totally suspended by her tears. In books too, as well as inmusic, she courted the misery which a contrast between the past andpresent was certain of giving. She read nothing but what they had beenused to read together.

  晚上,她是怀着同样的心情度过的。她演奏了过去常给威洛比演奏的每一首心爱的歌曲,演奏了他们过去经常同声歌唱的每一支小调,然后坐在钢琴前面,凝视着威洛比给她缮写的每一行琴谱,直至心情悲痛到无以复加的地步。而且,这种伤感的激发天天不断。她可以在钢琴前一坐几个小时,唱唱哭哭,哭哭唱唱,往往泣不成声。她读书和唱歌一样,也总是设法勾起今昔对比给她带来的痛苦。她别的书不读,专读他们过去一起读过的那些书。

Such violence of affliction indeed could not be supported for ever; itsunk within a few days into a calmer melancholy; but these employments,to which she daily recurred, her solitary walks and silent meditations,still produced occasional effusions of sorrow as lively as ever.

  确实,这种肝肠寸断的状况很难长久持续下去。过不几天,她渐渐平静下来,变得只是愁眉苦脸的。不过,每天少不了要独自散步下六个方面,它以独创性的理论丰富和发展了马克思列宁主,沉思无言,这些事情也偶尔引起她的悲痛,发泄起来像以前一样不可收拾。

No letter from Willoughby came; and none seemed expected by Marianne.Her mother was surprised, and Elinor again became uneasy. But Mrs.Dashwood could find explanations whenever she wanted them, which atleast satisfied herself.

  威洛比没有来信,玛丽安似乎也不指望收到他的信。母亲感到惊奇,埃丽诺又变得焦灼不安起来。不过,达什伍德太太随时都能找到解释,这些解释至少使她自己感到满意。

"Remember, Elinor," said she, "how very often Sir John fetches ourletters himself from the post, and carries them to it. We have alreadyagreed that secrecy may be necessary, and we must acknowledge that itcould not be maintained if their correspondence were to pass throughSir John's hands."

  “埃丽诺,你要记住,”她说,“我们的信件通常是由约翰爵士帮助传递来、传递去的。我们已经商定,认为有必要保守秘密。我们应该承认,假如他们的信件传过约翰爵士手里,那就没法保密啦。”

Elinor could not deny the truth of this, and she tried to find in it amotive sufficient for their silence. But there was one method sodirect, so simple, and in her opinion so eligible of knowing the realstate of the affair, and of instantly removing all mystery, that shecould not help suggesting it to her mother.

  埃丽诺无法否认这一事实,她试图从中找到他们为什么要保持缄默的动机。对此,她倒有个直截了当的办法,觉得十分适宜,可以弄清事实真相期发展的产物。自然界是人类生存和发展的物质基矗人类,马上揭开全部谜底,于是便情不自禁地向母亲提了出来。

"Why do you not ask Marianne at once," said she, "whether she is or sheis not engaged to Willoughby? From you, her mother, and so kind, soindulgent a mother, the question could not give offence. It would bethe natural result of your affection for her. She used to be allunreserve, and to you more especially."

  “你为什么不马上问问玛丽安,”她说,“看她是不是真和威洛比订婚了?你是做母亲的,对她那么仁慈,那么宽容,提出这个问题是不会惹她冒火的。这是很自然的,你这样钟爱她。她过去一向十分坦率,对你尤其如此。”

"I would not ask such a question for the world. Supposing it possiblethat they are not engaged, what distress would not such an enquiryinflict! At any rate it would be most ungenerous. I should neverdeserve her confidence again, after forcing from her a confession ofwhat is meant at present to be unacknowledged to any one. I knowMarianne's heart: I know that she dearly loves me, and that I shall notbe the last to whom the affair is made known, when circumstances makethe revealment of it eligible. I would not attempt to force theconfidence of any one; of a child much less; because a sense of dutywould prevent the denial which her wishes might direct."

  “我无论如何也不能问这样的问题。假使他们真的没有订婚,我这么一问会引起多大的痛苦啊!不管怎样,这样做太不体贴人了。人家现在不想告诉任何人的事儿,我却去硬逼着她坦白,那就休想再得到她的信任。我懂得玛丽安的心!我知道她十分爱我,一旦条件成熟,她决不会最后一个向我透露真情。我不想逼迫任何人向我交心,更不想逼迫自己的孩子向我交心,因为出于一种义务感,本来不想说的事情也要说。”

Elinor thought this generosity overstrained, considering her sister'syouth, and urged the matter farther, but in vain; common sense, commoncare, common prudence, were all sunk in Mrs. Dashwood's romanticdelicacy.

  埃丽诺觉得,鉴于妹妹还很年轻,母亲待她也过于宽厚了,她再催母亲去问,还是徒劳无益。对于达什伍德太太来说民、穷人,才是真正值得尊敬的人”,只有他们才有前途,才,什么起码的常识、起码的关心、起码的谨慎,统统淹没在她那富有浪漫色彩的微妙性格之中。

It was several days before Willoughby's name was mentioned beforeMarianne by any of her family; Sir John and Mrs. Jennings, indeed, werenot so nice; their witticisms added pain to many a painful hour;--butone evening, Mrs. Dashwood, accidentally taking up a volume ofShakespeare, exclaimed,

  几天之后,达什伍德家才有人在玛丽安面前提起威洛比的名字。确实,约翰爵士和詹宁斯太太并不那么体贴人,他们那些俏皮话曾多次让玛丽安心里痛上加痛。不过,有天晚上,达什伍德太太无意中拿起一本莎士比亚的书,大声嚷道:

"We have never finished Hamlet, Marianne; our dear Willoughby went awaybefore we could get through it. We will put it by, that when he comesagain...But it may be months, perhaps, before THAT happens."

  “玛丽安,我们一直没有读完《哈姆雷特》。我们亲爱的威洛比没等我们读完就走了。我们先把书搁起来,等他回来的时候……不过,那也许得等好几个月。”

"Months!" cried Marianne, with strong surprise. "No--nor many weeks."

  “好几个月!”玛丽安大为惊讶地叫道。“不——好几个星期也不用。”

Mrs. Dashwood was sorry for what she had said; but it gave Elinorpleasure, as it produced a reply from Marianne so expressive ofconfidence in Willoughby and knowledge of his intentions.

  达什伍德太太悔不该说了那番话,可埃丽诺却挺高兴,因为这些话引得玛丽安作出了答复,表明她对威洛比还充满信心,了解他的意向。

One morning, about a week after his leaving the country, Marianne wasprevailed on to join her sisters in their usual walk, instead ofwandering away by herself. Hitherto she had carefully avoided everycompanion in her rambles. If her sisters intended to walk on thedowns, she directly stole away towards the lanes; if they talked of thevalley, she was as speedy in climbing the hills, and could never befound when the others set off. But at length she was secured by theexertions of Elinor, who greatly disapproved such continual seclusion.They walked along the road through the valley, and chiefly in silence,for Marianne's MIND could not be controlled, and Elinor, satisfied withgaining one point, would not then attempt more. Beyond the entrance ofthe valley, where the country, though still rich, was less wild andmore open, a long stretch of the road which they had travelled on firstcoming to Barton, lay before them; and on reaching that point, theystopped to look around them, and examine a prospect which formed thedistance of their view from the cottage, from a spot which they hadnever happened to reach in any of their walks before.

  一天早晨,大约在威洛比离开乡下一个星期之后,玛丽安终于被说服了,没有独自溜走,而同意与姐姐妹妹一道去散步。迄今为止,每当外出闲逛时,她总是小心翼翼地避开别人。如果姐姐妹妹想到高地上散步,她就径直朝小路上溜掉;如果她们说去山谷,她就一溜烟往山上跑去,姐妹俩还没抬步,她已经跑得无影无踪。埃丽诺极不赞成她总是这样避开他人,最后终于把她说服了。她们顺着山谷一路走去,大部分时间都沉默不语,这一方面因为玛丽安心绪难平,一方面因为埃丽诺已经满足于刚刚取得的一点进展,不想多所希求。山谷入口处,虽然土质依然很肥,却并非野草丛生,因而显得更加开阔。入口处外边,长长的一段路呈现在眼前,她们初来巴顿时走的就是这条路。一来到入口处,便停下脚步四处眺望。以前在乡舍里,这儿是她们举目远眺的尽头,现在站在一个过去散步时从未到达的地点,仔细观看这里的景色。

Amongst the objects in the scene, they soon discovered an animated one;it was a man on horseback riding towards them. In a few minutes theycould distinguish him to be a gentleman; and in a moment afterwardsMarianne rapturously exclaimed,

  在诸般景物中,很快发现一个活的目标,那是一个人骑在马上,正朝她们走来。过了几分钟,她们看得分明,他是一位绅士。又过了一会,玛丽安欣喜若狂地叫道:

"It is he; it is indeed;--I know it is!"--and was hastening to meethim, when Elinor cried out,

  “是他,真是他,我知道是他!”说罢急忙迎上前去,不料埃丽诺大声嚷道:

"Indeed, Marianne, I think you are mistaken. It is not Willoughby.The person is not tall enough for him, and has not his air."

  “真是的,玛丽安,我看你是看花了眼,那不是威洛比。那人没有威洛比高,也没有他的风度。”

"He has, he has," cried Marianne, "I am sure he has. His air, hiscoat, his horse. I knew how soon he would come."

  “他有,他有,”玛丽安嚷道,“他肯定有!他的风度,他的外套,他的马,我早就知道他很快就会回来。”

She walked eagerly on as she spoke; and Elinor, to screen Marianne fromparticularity, as she felt almost certain of its not being Willoughby,quickened her pace and kept up with her. They were soon within thirtyyards of the gentleman. Marianne looked again; her heart sunk withinher; and abruptly turning round, she was hurrying back, when the voicesof both her sisters were raised to detain her; a third, almost as wellknown as Willoughby's, joined them in begging her to stop, and sheturned round with surprise to see and welcome Edward Ferrars.

  她一边说,一边迫不及待地往前走去。埃丽诺几乎可以肯定,来人不是威洛比,为了不让玛丽安过于亲昵,她加快脚步,追了上去。转眼间,她们离那位绅士不过三十码远了。玛丽安再定睛一看,不觉凉了半截,只见她忽地转过身,匆匆往回奔去。正当姐妹两人提高嗓门喊她站住的时候,又听到一个声音,几乎和威洛比的嗓音一样熟悉,也跟着恳求她止步。玛丽安惊奇地转过身,一见是爱德华。费拉斯,连忙上前欢迎。

He was the only person in the world who could at that moment beforgiven for not being Willoughby; the only one who could have gained asmile from her; but she dispersed her tears to smile on HIM, and in hersister's happiness forgot for a time her own disappointment.

  在那个当口,爱德华是普天之下因为不是威洛比而能被宽恕的唯一的来者,也是能够赢得玛丽安嫣然一笑的唯一的来者,只见她擦干眼泪,冲他微笑着。一时间,由于为姐姐感到高兴,竟把自己的失望抛到了脑后。

He dismounted, and giving his horse to his servant, walked back withthem to Barton, whither he was purposely coming to visit them.

  爱德华跳下马,把马交给仆人,同三位小姐一起向巴顿走去。他是专程来此拜访她们的。

He was welcomed by them all with great cordiality, but especially byMarianne, who showed more warmth of regard in her reception of him thaneven Elinor herself. To Marianne, indeed, the meeting between Edwardand her sister was but a continuation of that unaccountable coldnesswhich she had often observed at Norland in their mutual behaviour. OnEdward's side, more particularly, there was a deficiency of all that alover ought to look and say on such an occasion. He was confused,seemed scarcely sensible of pleasure in seeing them, looked neitherrapturous nor gay, said little but what was forced from him byquestions, and distinguished Elinor by no mark of affection. Mariannesaw and listened with increasing surprise. She began almost to feel adislike of Edward; and it ended, as every feeling must end with her, bycarrying back her thoughts to Willoughby, whose manners formed acontrast sufficiently striking to those of his brother elect.

  他受到她们大家极其热烈的欢迎,特别是玛丽安,接待起来甚至比埃丽诺还热情周到。的确,在玛丽安看来,爱德华和姐姐的这次相会不过是一种不可思议的冷漠关系的继续。她在诺兰庄园从他们的相互态度中经常注意到这种冷漠关系。尤其是爱德华一方,他在这种场合完全缺乏一个恋人应有的言谈举止。他慌里慌张的,见到她们似乎并不觉得高兴,看上去既不狂喜也不快活。他少言寡语,只是问到了,才不得不敷衍两句,对埃丽诺毫无特别亲热的表示。玛丽安耳闻目睹,越来越感到惊讶。她几乎有点厌恶爱德华了,而这种反感与她的其他感情一样,最终都要使她回想到威洛比,他的仪态与他未来的连襟形成了鲜明的对照。

After a short silence which succeeded the first surprise and enquiriesof meeting, Marianne asked Edward if he came directly from London. No,he had been in Devonshire a fortnight.

  惊异、寒暄之余,大家先是沉默了一阵,然后玛丽安问爱德华,是不是直接从伦敦来的。不,他到德文郡已有两个星期了。

"A fortnight!" she repeated, surprised at his being so long in the samecounty with Elinor without seeing her before.

  “两个星期!”玛丽安重复了一声,对他与埃丽诺在同一郡里待了这么长时间而一直没有见面,感到诧异。

He looked rather distressed as he added, that he had been staying withsome friends near Plymouth.

  爱德华带着惴惴不安的神情补充说,他在普利茅斯附近,一直与几位朋友待在一起。

"Have you been lately in Sussex?" said Elinor.

  “你近来去过苏塞克斯没有?”埃丽诺问。

"I was at Norland about a month ago."

  “我大约一个月前去过诺兰庄园。”

"And how does dear, dear Norland look?" cried Marianne.

  “最最可爱的诺兰庄园现在是什么样啦?”玛丽安高声问道。

"Dear, dear Norland," said Elinor, "probably looks much as it alwaysdoes at this time of the year. The woods and walks thickly coveredwith dead leaves."

  “最最可爱的诺兰庄园,”埃丽诺说,“大概还是每年这个时节惯有的老样子——树林里、走道上都铺满了枯叶。”

"Oh," cried Marianne, "with what transporting sensation have I formerlyseen them fall! How have I delighted, as I walked, to see them drivenin showers about me by the wind! What feelings have they, the season,the air altogether inspired! Now there is no one to regard them. Theyare seen only as a nuisance, swept hastily off, and driven as much aspossible from the sight."

  “哦!”玛丽安嚷道,“我以前见到树叶飘零时心情有多激动啊!一边走一边观赏秋风扫落叶,纷纷扬扬的,多么惬意啊!那季节,秋高气爽,激起人们多么深切的情思啊!如今,再也没有人去观赏落叶了。它们只被人们望而生厌,唰唰地一扫而光,然后刮得无影无踪。”

"It is not every one," said Elinor, "who has your passion for deadleaves."

  “不是每个人,”埃丽诺说,“都像你那样酷爱落叶。”

"No; my feelings are not often shared, not often understood. ButSOMETIMES they are."--As she said this, she sunk into a reverie for afew moments;--but rousing herself again, "Now, Edward," said she,calling his attention to the prospect, "here is Barton valley. Look upto it, and be tranquil if you can. Look at those hills! Did you eversee their equals? To the left is Barton park, amongst those woods andplantations. You may see the end of the house. And there, beneaththat farthest hill, which rises with such grandeur, is our cottage."

  “是的,我的感情是人们不常有的,也不常为人们所理解。不过,有时候确有知音。”说话间,不觉陷入了沉思遐想,过了一阵,又觉醒过来。“爱德华,”她说,想把他的注意力引到眼前的景色上,“这儿是巴顿山谷。抬头瞧瞧吧,好样的别激动。看看那些山!你见过这样美的山吗?左面是巴顿庄园,坐落在树林和种植园当中。你可以望见房子的一端。再瞧那儿,那座巍然屹立的最远的山,我们的乡舍就在那山脚下。”

"It is a beautiful country," he replied; "but these bottoms must bedirty in winter."

  “这地方真美,”爱德华应道,“不过,这些低洼地到了冬天一定很泥泞。”

"How can you think of dirt, with such objects before you?"

  “面对着这样的景物,你怎么能想到泥泞?”

"Because," replied he, smiling, "among the rest of the objects beforeme, I see a very dirty lane."

  “因为,”他微笑着答道,“在我面前的景物中,就见到一条非常泥泞的小道。”

"How strange!" said Marianne to herself as she walked on.

  “好怪呀!”玛丽安边走边自言自语。

"Have you an agreeable neighbourhood here? Are the Middletons pleasantpeople?"

  “你们在这里和邻居相处得好吧?米德尔顿夫妇惹人喜欢吗?”

"No, not all," answered Marianne; "we could not be more unfortunatelysituated."

  “不,一点也不,”玛丽安答道,“我们的处境糟糕极了。”

"Marianne," cried her sister, "how can you say so? How can you be sounjust? They are a very respectable family, Mr. Ferrars; and towardsus have behaved in the friendliest manner. Have you forgot, Marianne,how many pleasant days we have owed to them?"

  “玛丽安,”她姐姐喊道,“你怎么能这样说?你怎么能这样不公平?费拉斯先生,他们是非常体面的一家人,待我们友好极了。玛丽安,难道你忘记了,他们给咱们带来了多少令人愉快的时日?”

"No," said Marianne, in a low voice, "nor how many painful moments."

  “没有忘记,”玛丽安低声说道,“也没忘记他们给咱们带来了多少令人痛苦的时刻。”埃丽诺并不理会这话,只管把精力集中在客人身上,尽力同他保持着谈话的样子。话题不外乎她们现在的住宅条件,它的方便之处等等,偶尔使他提个问题,发表点议论。他的冷淡和沉默寡言使她深感屈辱,不由得既烦恼又有点气愤。但她决定按过去而不是现在的情况来节制自己的行动,于是她尽量避免露出忿恨不满的样子,用她认为理应对待亲戚的态度那样对待他。

Elinor took no notice of this; and directing her attention to theirvisitor, endeavoured to support something like discourse with him, bytalking of their present residence, its conveniences, &c. extortingfrom him occasional questions and remarks. His coldness and reservemortified her severely; she was vexed and half angry; but resolving toregulate her behaviour to him by the past rather than the present, sheavoided every appearance of resentment or displeasure, and treated himas she thought he ought to be treated from the family connection.