Sense and Sensibility  理智与情感

"I should be undeserving of the confidence you have honoured me with,if I felt no desire for its continuance, or no farther curiosity on itssubject. I will not apologize therefore for bringing it forward again."

  “我有幸得到你的信任,若是不要求你继续说下去,不好奇地穷根究底,岂不辜负了你对我的信任。因此,我不禁冒昧,想再提出这个话题。”

"Thank you," cried Lucy warmly, "for breaking the ice; you have set myheart at ease by it; for I was somehow or other afraid I had offendedyou by what I told you that Monday."

  “谢谢你打破了僵局,”露西激动地嚷道,“你这样讲就让我放心啦。不知怎么搞的,我总是担心星期一那天说话得罪了你。”

"Offended me! How could you suppose so? Believe me," and Elinor spokeit with the truest sincerity, "nothing could be farther from myintention than to give you such an idea. Could you have a motive forthe trust, that was not honourable and flattering to me?"

  “得罪了我!你想到哪里去了?请相信我,”埃丽诺极其诚恳地说道,“我不愿意让你产生这样的看法。你对我这样推心置腹,难道还会抱有让我感到不体面、不愉快的动机?”

"And yet I do assure you," replied Lucy, her little sharp eyes full ofmeaning, "there seemed to me to be a coldness and displeasure in yourmanner that made me quite uncomfortable. I felt sure that you wasangry with me; and have been quarrelling with myself ever since, forhaving took such a liberty as to trouble you with my affairs. But I amvery glad to find it was only my own fancy, and that you really do notblame me. If you knew what a consolation it was to me to relieve myheart speaking to you of what I am always thinking of every moment ofmy life, your compassion would make you overlook every thing else I amsure."

  “不过,说实在的,”露西回答说,一双敏锐的小眼睛意味深长地望着她,“你当时的态度似乎很冷淡,很不高兴,搞得我十分尴尬。我想你准是生我的气了。此后我一直在怪罪自己,不该冒昧地拿我自己的事情打扰你。不过我很高兴地发现,这只不过是我的错觉,你并没真地责怪我,说实在话,你若是知道我向你倾吐一下我无时无刻不在思量的真心话,心里觉得有多么宽慰,你就会同情我,而不计较别的东西。”

"Indeed, I can easily believe that it was a very great relief to you,to acknowledge your situation to me, and be assured that you shallnever have reason to repent it. Your case is a very unfortunate one;you seem to me to be surrounded with difficulties, and you will haveneed of all your mutual affection to support you under them. Mr.Ferrars, I believe, is entirely dependent on his mother."

  “的确,我不难想象,你把你的处境告诉我,而且确信一辈子不用后悔,这对你真是个莫大的宽慰。你们的情况十分不幸,后来好似是困难重重,你们需要依靠相互的钟情坚持下去。我想,费拉斯先生完全依赖于他母亲。”

"He has only two thousand pounds of his own; it would be madness tomarry upon that, though for my own part, I could give up every prospectof more without a sigh. I have been always used to a very smallincome, and could struggle with any poverty for him; but I love him toowell to be the selfish means of robbing him, perhaps, of all that hismother might give him if he married to please her. We must wait, itmay be for many years. With almost every other man in the world, itwould be an alarming prospect; but Edward's affection and constancynothing can deprive me of I know."

  “他自己只有两千镑的收入,单靠这点钱结婚,那简直是发疯。不过就我自己来说,我可以毫无怨气地放弃更高的追求。我一直习惯于微薄的收入,为了他我可以与贫穷作斗争。但是我太爱他了,他若是娶个使他母亲中意的太太,也许会得到她的不少财产,我不想自私自利地让爱德华丧失掉这些财产。我们必须等待,也许要等许多年。对天下几乎所有的男人来说,这是个令人不寒而栗的前景。可是我知道,爱德华对我的一片深情和忠贞不渝是什么力量也剥夺不了的。”

"That conviction must be every thing to you; and he is undoubtedlysupported by the same trust in your's. If the strength of yourreciprocal attachment had failed, as between many people, and undermany circumstances it naturally would during a four years' engagement,your situation would have been pitiable, indeed."

  “你有这个信念,这对你是至关紧要的。毫无疑问,他对你也抱有同样的信念。万一你们相互间情淡爱弛(这是在许多人之间,许多情况下,在四年订婚期间经常发生的现象),你的境况确实会是很可怜的。”

Lucy here looked up; but Elinor was careful in guarding her countenancefrom every expression that could give her words a suspicious tendency.

  露西听到这儿抬起眼来。哪知埃丽诺十分谨慎,不露声色,让人觉察不出她的话里有什么可疑的意向。

"Edward's love for me," said Lucy, "has been pretty well put to thetest, by our long, very long absence since we were first engaged, andit has stood the trial so well, that I should be unpardonable to doubtit now. I can safely say that he has never gave me one moment's alarmon that account from the first."

  “爱德华对我的爱情,”露西说,“自从我们订婚以来,经受了长期分离的严峻考验,我再去妄加怀疑,那是无法宽恕的。我可以万无一失地说:他从一开始,从未由于这个原因而给我带来一时一刻的惊扰。”

Elinor hardly knew whether to smile or sigh at this assertion.

  埃丽诺听到她所说的,简直不知道是应该付之一笑,还是应该为之叹息。

Lucy went on. "I am rather of a jealous temper too by nature, and fromour different situations in life, from his being so much more in theworld than me, and our continual separation, I was enough inclined forsuspicion, to have found out the truth in an instant, if there had beenthe slightest alteration in his behaviour to me when we met, or anylowness of spirits that I could not account for, or if he had talkedmore of one lady than another, or seemed in any respect less happy atLongstaple than he used to be. I do not mean to say that I amparticularly observant or quick-sighted in general, but in such a caseI am sure I could not be deceived."

  露西继续往下说。“我生性也好妒忌,因为我们的生活处境不同,他比我见的世面多得多,再加上我们又长期分离,我老爱疑神疑鬼。我们见面时,哪伯他对我的态度发生一点细微的变化,他的情绪出现莫名其妙的低落现象,他对某一个女人比对别的女人谈论得多了些,他在郎斯特普尔显得不像过去那么快乐,我马上就能觉察出来。我并不是说,我的观察力一般都很敏锐,眼睛一般都很尖,但是在这种情况下,我肯定是不会受蒙骗的。”

"All this," thought Elinor, "is very pretty; but it can impose uponneither of us."

  “说得倒很动听,”埃丽诺心里在想,“可是我们两人谁也不会上当受骗。”

"But what," said she after a short silence, "are your views? or haveyou none but that of waiting for Mrs. Ferrars's death, which is amelancholy and shocking extremity?--Is her son determined to submit tothis, and to all the tediousness of the many years of suspense in whichit may involve you, rather than run the risk of her displeasure for awhile by owning the truth?"

  “不过,”她稍许沉默了一刻,然后说,“你的观点如何?还是你什么观点也没有,而只是采取一个今人忧伤而震惊的极端措施,就等着费拉斯太太一死了事?难道她儿子就甘心屈服,打定主意拖累着你,这么长年悬吊着,索然无味地生活下去,而不肯冒着惹她一时不快的风险,干脆向她说明事实真相?”

"If we could be certain that it would be only for a while! But Mrs.Ferrars is a very headstrong proud woman, and in her first fit of angerupon hearing it, would very likely secure every thing to Robert, andthe idea of that, for Edward's sake, frightens away all my inclinationfor hasty measures."

  “我们若是能肯定她只是一时不快就好啦!可惜费拉斯太太是个刚愎自用、妄自尊大的女人,一听到这消息,发起怒来,很可能把所有财产都交给罗伯特。一想到这里,看在爱德华的份上,竟吓得我不敢草率行事。”

"And for your own sake too, or you are carrying your disinterestednessbeyond reason."

  “也看在你自己的份上,不然你的自我牺牲就不可理解了。”

Lucy looked at Elinor again, and was silent.

  露西又瞅瞅埃丽诺,可是没有作声。

"Do you know Mr. Robert Ferrars?" asked Elinor.

  “你认识罗伯特。费拉斯先生吗?”埃丽诺问道。

"Not at all--I never saw him; but I fancy he is very unlike hisbrother--silly and a great coxcomb."

  “一点不认识——我从没见过他。不过,我想他与他哥哥大不一样——傻乎乎的,是个十足的花花公子。”

"A great coxcomb!" repeated Miss Steele, whose ear had caught thosewords by a sudden pause in Marianne's music.-- "Oh, they are talking oftheir favourite beaux, I dare say."

  “十足的花花公子。”斯蒂尔小姐重复了一声,她是在玛丽安的琴声突然中断时,听到这几个词的。“噢!她们准是在议论她们的心上人。”

"No sister," cried Lucy, "you are mistaken there, our favourite beauxare NOT great coxcombs."

  “不,姐姐,”露西嚷道,“你搞错啦,我们的心上人可不是十足的花花公子。”

"I can answer for it that Miss Dashwood's is not," said Mrs. Jennings,laughing heartily; "for he is one of the modestest, prettiest behavedyoung men I ever saw; but as for Lucy, she is such a sly littlecreature, there is no finding out who SHE likes."

  “我敢担保,达什伍德小姐的心上人不是花花公子,”詹宁斯太太说着,纵情笑了。“他是我见过的最谦虚、最文雅的一个年轻人。不过,说到露西,她是个狡猾的小精怪,谁也不知道她喜欢谁。”

"Oh," cried Miss Steele, looking significantly round at them, "I daresay Lucy's beau is quite as modest and pretty behaved as MissDashwood's."

  “噢!”斯蒂尔小姐嚷道,一面意味深长地望着她俩,“也许,露西的心上人和达什伍德小姐的心上人一样谦虚,一样文雅。”

Elinor blushed in spite of herself. Lucy bit her lip, and lookedangrily at her sister. A mutual silence took place for some time.Lucy first put an end to it by saying in a lower tone, though Mariannewas then giving them the powerful protection of a very magnificentconcerto--

  埃丽诺不由得羞得满脸通红。露西咬咬嘴唇,愤怒地瞪着她姐姐。两人沉默了一阵。露西首先打破了沉默,虽然玛丽安弹起了一支极其优美的协奏曲,给她们提供了有效的掩护,但她说话的声音还是压得很低:

"I will honestly tell you of one scheme which has lately come into myhead, for bringing matters to bear; indeed I am bound to let you intothe secret, for you are a party concerned. I dare say you have seenenough of Edward to know that he would prefer the church to every otherprofession; now my plan is that he should take orders as soon as hecan, and then through your interest, which I am sure you would be kindenough to use out of friendship for him, and I hope out of some regardto me, your brother might be persuaded to give him Norland living;which I understand is a very good one, and the present incumbent notlikely to live a great while. That would be enough for us to marryupon, and we might trust to time and chance for the rest."

  “我想坦率地告诉你,我最近想到了一个切实可行的好办法。的确,我有责任让你知道这个秘密,因为事情与你有关。你常见到爱德华,一定知道他最喜欢当牧师。我的想法是这样的:他尽快地接受圣职,然后希望你能出自对他的友情和对我的关心,利用你的影响,劝说你哥哥把诺兰的牧师职位赐给他。我听说这是个很不错的职务,而且现在的牧师也活不多久了。这就可以保证我们先结婚,余下的事情再听天由命吧。”

"I should always be happy," replied Elinor, "to show any mark of myesteem and friendship for Mr. Ferrars; but do you not perceive that myinterest on such an occasion would be perfectly unnecessary? He isbrother to Mrs. John Dashwood--THAT must be recommendation enough toher husband."

  “我一向乐于表示我对费拉斯先生的敬意和友情,”埃丽诺答道。“不过,难道你不觉得我在这种场合插一手完全大可不必吗?他是约翰。达什伍德夫人的弟弟__就凭这一点,她丈夫也会提拔他的。”

"But Mrs. John Dashwood would not much approve of Edward's going intoorders."

  “可是约翰。达什伍德夫人并不同意爱德华去当牧师。”

"Then I rather suspect that my interest would do very little."

  “这样的话,我觉得我去说更是无济于事。”

They were again silent for many minutes. At length Lucy exclaimed witha deep sigh,

  她们又沉默了好半天。最后,露西深深叹了口气,大声说道:

"I believe it would be the wisest way to put an end to the business atonce by dissolving the engagement. We seem so beset with difficultieson every side, that though it would make us miserable for a time, weshould be happier perhaps in the end. But you will not give me youradvice, Miss Dashwood?"

  “我认为,最明智的办法还是解除婚约,立即终止这门亲事。我们好像困难重重,四面受阻,虽然要痛苦一阵子,但是最终也许会更幸福些。不过,达什伍德小姐,是不是请你给我出出主意?”

"No," answered Elinor, with a smile, which concealed very agitatedfeelings, "on such a subject I certainly will not. You know very wellthat my opinion would have no weight with you, unless it were on theside of your wishes."

  “不,”埃丽诺答道,她脸上的微笑掩饰着内心的忐忑不安。“在这个问题上,我当然不会给你出什么主意。你心里很有数,我的意见除非顺从你的意愿,不然对你是不起作用的。”

"Indeed you wrong me," replied Lucy, with great solemnity; "I knownobody of whose judgment I think so highly as I do of yours; and I doreally believe, that if you was to say to me, 'I advise you by allmeans to put an end to your engagement with Edward Ferrars, it will bemore for the happiness of both of you,' I should resolve upon doing itimmediately."

  “说真的,你冤枉了我,”露西一本正经地答遏。“在我认识的人中,我最尊重你的意见。我的确相信,假使你对我说:‘我劝你无论如何要取消同爱德华。费拉斯的婚约,这会使你们两个更幸福。’那我就会决定马上这样做。”,

Elinor blushed for the insincerity of Edward's future wife, andreplied, "This compliment would effectually frighten me from giving anyopinion on the subject had I formed one. It raises my influence muchtoo high; the power of dividing two people so tenderly attached is toomuch for an indifferent person."

  埃丽诺为爱德华未婚妻的虚情假意感到脸红,她回答说:“假如我在这个问题上真有什么意见可言的话,一听到你这番恭维,准给吓得不敢开口了。你把我的声威抬举得过高了。要把一对情深意切的恋人分开,对一个局外人来说,实在是无能为力的。”

"'Tis because you are an indifferent person," said Lucy, with somepique, and laying a particular stress on those words, "that yourjudgment might justly have such weight with me. If you could besupposed to be biased in any respect by your own feelings, your opinionwould not be worth having."

  “正因为你是个局外人,”露西有点生气地说道,特别加重了那后几个字,“你的意见才理所当然地受到我的重视。如果我觉得你带有任何偏见,就犯不着去征求你的意见,”

Elinor thought it wisest to make no answer to this, lest they mightprovoke each other to an unsuitable increase of ease and unreserve; andwas even partly determined never to mention the subject again. Anotherpause therefore of many minutes' duration, succeeded this speech, andLucy was still the first to end it.

  埃丽诺认为,最好对此不加辩解,以免相互间变得过于随随便便、无拘无束。她甚至在一定程度上下了决心,再也不提这个话题。因此,露西说完后,又沉寂了好几分钟,而且还是露西首先打破了沉默。

"Shall you be in town this winter, Miss Dashwood?" said she with allher accustomary complacency.

  “你今年冬天去城里吗,达什伍德小姐?,”她带着她惯常的自鸣得意的神气问道。

"Certainly not."

  “当然不去。”

"I am sorry for that," returned the other, while her eyes brightened atthe information, "it would have gave me such pleasure to meet youthere! But I dare say you will go for all that. To be sure, yourbrother and sister will ask you to come to them."

  “真可惜,”露西回答说,其实她一听那话,眼里不禁露出了喜色。“我若是能在城里见到你,那该有多高兴啊!不过,尽管如此,你还是肯定会去的。毫无疑问,你哥嫂会请你去作客的。”

"It will not be in my power to accept their invitation if they do."

  “他们即使邀请,我也不能接受。”

"How unlucky that is! I had quite depended upon meeting you there.Anne and me are to go the latter end of January to some relations whohave been wanting us to visit them these several years! But I only gofor the sake of seeing Edward. He will be there in February, otherwiseLondon would have no charms for me; I have not spirits for it."

  “这太不幸啦!我本来一直指望在城里见到你。一月底,安妮和我要去探访几个亲友,他们这几年总是叫我们去!不过,我只是为了去见见爱德华,他二月份到那里去。不然的话,伦敦对我—点儿惑力也没有,我才没有兴致去那里呢,”

Elinor was soon called to the card-table by the conclusion of the firstrubber, and the confidential discourse of the two ladies was thereforeat an end, to which both of them submitted without any reluctance, fornothing had been said on either side to make them dislike each otherless than they had done before; and Elinor sat down to the card tablewith the melancholy persuasion that Edward was not only withoutaffection for the person who was to be his wife; but that he had noteven the chance of being tolerably happy in marriage, which sincereaffection on HER side would have given, for self-interest alone couldinduce a woman to keep a man to an engagement, of which she seemed sothoroughly aware that he was weary.

  过了不一会儿,牌桌上打完了第一局,埃丽诺也就被叫了过去,于是两位小姐的秘密交谈便告结束。不过结束得并不勉强,因为双方没有说上什么投机话,可以减少她们相互之间的厌恶之情。埃丽诺在牌桌前坐定,忧伤地判定,爱德华不仅不喜欢他这位未婚妻,而且他即使同她结了婚,也不会感到多么幸福,只有她埃丽诺的真挚爱情才能给他婚后带来幸福;因为只是凭着自私自利这一点,才能使得一个女人保持同男方的婚约,而这个女人似乎完全意识到,男方已经厌倦这种婚约。

From this time the subject was never revived by Elinor, and whenentered on by Lucy, who seldom missed an opportunity of introducing it,and was particularly careful to inform her confidante, of her happinesswhenever she received a letter from Edward, it was treated by theformer with calmness and caution, and dismissed as soon as civilitywould allow; for she felt such conversations to be an indulgence whichLucy did not deserve, and which were dangerous to herself.

  从此之后,埃丽诺再也没有重新提起这个话题。露西却很少错过旧话重提的机会,特别是当她收到爱德华的来信时,总要别有心计地向她的知己女友报报喜。每逢这种情况,埃丽诺都能泰然处之,谨慎对待,在礼貌允许的范围内尽快结束这些谈论。因为她觉得这种谈话对露西是一种不配享受的乐趣,对她自己却是危险的。

The visit of the Miss Steeles at Barton Park was lengthened far beyondwhat the first invitation implied. Their favour increased; they couldnot be spared; Sir John would not hear of their going; and in spite oftheir numerous and long arranged engagements in Exeter, in spite of theabsolute necessity of returning to fulfill them immediately, which wasin full force at the end of every week, they were prevailed on to staynearly two months at the park, and to assist in the due celebration ofthat festival which requires a more than ordinary share of privateballs and large dinners to proclaim its importance.

  两位斯蒂尔小姐对巴顿庄园的访问一再延长,大大超过了最初邀请时双方认可的日期。她们越来越受人喜爱,想走也走不了。约翰爵士坚决不让她们走。虽然她们在埃克塞特有一大堆早就安排好的事情,急需她们马上回去处理,尤其是越到周末事情越繁忙,但她们还是被说服在巴顿庄园呆了近两个月,并且协助主人家好好庆祝一下圣诞节,因为这个节日需要比一般节日举行更多的家庭舞会和大型晚宴,借以显示其重要性。