Sense and Sensibility  理智与情感

They arrived in due time at the place of destination, and as soon asthe string of carriages before them would allow, alighted, ascended thestairs, heard their names announced from one landing-place to anotherin an audible voice, and entered a room splendidly lit up, quite fullof company, and insufferably hot. When they had paid their tribute ofpoliteness by curtsying to the lady of the house, they were permittedto mingle in the crowd, and take their share of the heat andinconvenience, to which their arrival must necessarily add. After sometime spent in saying little or doing less, Lady Middleton sat down toCassino, and as Marianne was not in spirits for moving about, she andElinor luckily succeeding to chairs, placed themselves at no greatdistance from the table.

  她们按时到达目的地。前面的一串马车刚让开路,她们便走下车,登上楼梯,只听见仆人从一节节楼梯平台上传报着她们的姓名。她们走进一间灯火辉煌的客厅,里而宾客满堂,闷热难熬。她们彬彬有礼地向女主人行过屈膝礼,随后就来到众人之间。她们这一来,室内必然显得更热,更拥挤不堪,而她们也只好跟着一起活受罪。大家少言寡语、无所事事地呆了一阵之后,米德尔顿夫人便坐下玩卡西诺。玛丽安因无心走来走去,幸好又有空椅子,就和埃丽诺在离牌桌不远的地方坐了下来。

They had not remained in this manner long, before Elinor perceivedWilloughby, standing within a few yards of them, in earnestconversation with a very fashionable looking young woman. She sooncaught his eye, and he immediately bowed, but without attempting tospeak to her, or to approach Marianne, though he could not but see her;and then continued his discourse with the same lady. Elinor turnedinvoluntarily to Marianne, to see whether it could be unobserved byher. At that moment she first perceived him, and her whole countenanceglowing with sudden delight, she would have moved towards himinstantly, had not her sister caught hold of her.

  两人没坐多久,埃丽诺一下子发现了威洛比,只见他站在离她们几码处,正和一个非常时髦的年轻女子热切交谈。很快地,威洛比也看见了她,当即向她点点头,但是并不想同她搭话,也不想去接近玛丽安,虽说他不可能看不见她。随后,他又继续同那位女士交谈。埃丽诺不由自主地转向玛丽安,看她会不会没有注意到这一切。恰在此刻,玛丽安先望见了威洛比,心里突然一高兴,整个面孔都红了。她迫不及待地就想朝他那里奔去,不料让姐姐一把拽住了。

"Good heavens!" she exclaimed, "he is there--he is there--Oh! why doeshe not look at me? why cannot I speak to him?"

  “天啊!”玛丽安惊叫道,“他在那儿——他在那儿。哦!他怎么不看我?我为什么不能和他说话?”

"Pray, pray be composed," cried Elinor, "and do not betray what youfeel to every body present. Perhaps he has not observed you yet."

  “我求你安静一些,”埃丽诺叫道,“别把你的心思暴露给在场的每个人。也许他还没有发现你。”

This however was more than she could believe herself; and to becomposed at such a moment was not only beyond the reach of Marianne, itwas beyond her wish. She sat in an agony of impatience which affectedevery feature.

  可是,这话连她自己也不相信。在这种时刻安静下来,玛丽安不仅做不到,而且也不想这么做。她焦灼不安地坐在那里,整个脸色都变了。

At last he turned round again, and regarded them both; she started up,and pronouncing his name in a tone of affection, held out her hand tohim. He approached, and addressing himself rather to Elinor thanMarianne, as if wishing to avoid her eye, and determined not to observeher attitude, inquired in a hurried manner after Mrs. Dashwood, andasked how long they had been in town. Elinor was robbed of allpresence of mind by such an address, and was unable to say a word. Butthe feelings of her sister were instantly expressed. Her face wascrimsoned over, and she exclaimed, in a voice of the greatest emotion,"Good God! Willoughby, what is the meaning of this? Have you notreceived my letters? Will you not shake hands with me?"

  最后,威洛比终于又回过脸来,瞧着她们两人。玛丽安忽地立起身,亲昵地喊了一声他的名字,就势向他伸出了手。威洛比走过来,偏偏要找埃丽诺搭话,而不和玛丽安攀谈,好像一心想避开她的目光,决计不注意她的态度似的。他匆匆忙忙地问起达什伍德太太的情况,问起她们来城里多久了。埃丽诺看见他这样说话,一时搞得心慌意乱,结果一句话也说不出来。但是她妹妹却一股脑儿地把心里话都倒出来了。她满脸绯红,带着万分激动的语气嚷道:“天哪!威洛比,你这是什么意思?你难道没收到我的信?你难道不想和我握握手?”

He could not then avoid it, but her touch seemed painful to him, and heheld her hand only for a moment. During all this time he was evidentlystruggling for composure. Elinor watched his countenance and saw itsexpression becoming more tranquil. After a moment's pause, he spokewith calmness.

  不握手是不行啦,但是碰到玛丽安似乎又使他感到痛苦。他抓住她的手只握了一下。这段时间,他显然在设法让自己镇定下来。埃丽诺瞧瞧他的脸色,发觉他的表情变得稳静些了。停了一刻,只听他心平气和地说道:

"I did myself the honour of calling in Berkeley Street last Tuesday,and very much regretted that I was not fortunate enough to findyourselves and Mrs. Jennings at home. My card was not lost, I hope."

  “上星期二我荣幸地到伯克利街登门拜访,十分遗憾的是,很不凑巧,你们和詹宁斯太太都不在家。我想你们见到我的名片了。”

"But have you not received my notes?" cried Marianne in the wildestanxiety. "Here is some mistake I am sure--some dreadful mistake. Whatcan be the meaning of it? Tell me, Willoughby; for heaven's sake tellme, what is the matter?"

  “难道你没收到我的信?”玛丽安焦急万分地嚷道。“这里面肯定出差错了——一个十分可怕的差错。这到底是怎么回事?告诉我,威洛比——看在上帝的份上,告诉我,这是怎么回事?”

He made no reply; his complexion changed and all his embarrassmentreturned; but as if, on catching the eye of the young lady with whom hehad been previously talking, he felt the necessity of instant exertion,he recovered himself again, and after saying, "Yes, I had the pleasureof receiving the information of your arrival in town, which you were sogood as to send me," turned hastily away with a slight bow and joinedhis friend.

  威洛比没有回答,他的脸色变了,又现出一副窘态。但是,他一瞧见刚才与他谈话的那个年轻女士的目光,便感到需要马上克制住自己。他重新恢复了镇静,随后说:“是的,你一番好意寄给我的、通知我你们已经进城的信件,我荣幸地收到了。”说罢微微点了下头,急忙返身回到他的朋友跟前。,

Marianne, now looking dreadfully white, and unable to stand, sunk intoher chair, and Elinor, expecting every moment to see her faint, triedto screen her from the observation of others, while reviving her withlavender water.

  玛丽安的脸色看上去白得吓人,两腿站也站不住,一屁股坐到椅子上。埃丽诺随时都怕她昏厥过去,一面挡住她不让别人看见,一面用薰衣草香水给她定定神。”,

"Go to him, Elinor," she cried, as soon as she could speak, "and forcehim to come to me. Tell him I must see him again--must speak to himinstantly.-- I cannot rest--I shall not have a moment's peace till thisis explained--some dreadful misapprehension or other.-- Oh go to himthis moment."

  “你去找他,埃丽诺,”玛丽安一能讲话,便说道,“逼着他到我这儿来。告诉他我还要见他——马上有话对他说。我安不下心来——他不解释清楚,我一时一刻也安不下心来。一定发生了什么可怕的误会。哦,你马上去找他。”

"How can that be done? No, my dearest Marianne, you must wait. This isnot the place for explanations. Wait only till tomorrow."

  “那怎么行呢?不,我亲爱的玛丽安,你要等待。这不是作解释的地方。等到明天再说吧。”

With difficulty however could she prevent her from following himherself; and to persuade her to check her agitation, to wait, at least,with the appearance of composure, till she might speak to him with moreprivacy and more effect, was impossible; for Marianne continuedincessantly to give way in a low voice to the misery of her feelings,by exclamations of wretchedness. In a short time Elinor saw Willoughbyquit the room by the door towards the staircase, and telling Mariannethat he was gone, urged the impossibility of speaking to him again thatevening, as a fresh argument for her to be calm. She instantly beggedher sister would entreat Lady Middleton to take them home, as she wastoo miserable to stay a minute longer.

  她好不容易才拦住妹妹,没让她亲自去找威洛比,但要劝她不要激动,至少表面上要镇静些,劝她等到可以与他私下交谈的时候再谈,效果会更好些,这在玛丽安是做不到的。玛丽安一直在长吁短叹,低声倾吐着内心的悲伤。不一会儿,埃丽诺看到威洛比离开客厅朝楼梯口走去,便告诉玛丽安他已经走了,今晚说什么也同他谈不成了,进一步开导她要镇静。玛丽安当即请姐姐去求米德尔顿夫人带她们回家,因为她太难过了,一分钟也呆不下去啦。

Lady Middleton, though in the middle of a rubber, on being informedthat Marianne was unwell, was too polite to object for a moment to herwish of going away, and making over her cards to a friend, theydeparted as soon the carriage could be found. Scarcely a word wasspoken during their return to Berkeley Street. Marianne was in asilent agony, too much oppressed even for tears; but as Mrs. Jenningswas luckily not come home, they could go directly to their own room,where hartshorn restored her a little to herself. She was soonundressed and in bed, and as she seemed desirous of being alone, hersister then left her, and while she waited the return of Mrs. Jennings,had leisure enough for thinking over the past.

  米德尔顿夫人一局牌正好打到一半,听说玛丽安不舒服,想回去,客客气气地没显出一丝半点的不高兴,把牌交给了一位朋友,马车一准备好便连忙告辞回家。在返回伯克利街的途中,大家几乎一言未发。玛丽安过于伤心,连眼泪都流不出来,只好默默地忍受着。幸亏詹宁斯太太还没回家,她们径直走回自己房里,玛丽安闻了闻嗅盐,稍许镇定了些。她很快脱下衣服,上了床,似乎想一个人呆着,姐姐就走了出去。埃丽诺在等候詹宁斯太太回来的时候,有空仔细考虑了往事。

That some kind of engagement had subsisted between Willoughby andMarianne she could not doubt, and that Willoughby was weary of it,seemed equally clear; for however Marianne might still feed her ownwishes, SHE could not attribute such behaviour to mistake ormisapprehension of any kind. Nothing but a thorough change ofsentiment could account for it. Her indignation would have been stillstronger than it was, had she not witnessed that embarrassment whichseemed to speak a consciousness of his own misconduct, and preventedher from believing him so unprincipled as to have been sporting withthe affections of her sister from the first, without any design thatwould bear investigation. Absence might have weakened his regard, andconvenience might have determined him to overcome it, but that such aregard had formerly existed she could not bring herself to doubt.

  无可怀疑,威洛比和玛丽安曾订过婚;而同样明白无疑的是,威洛比对此厌倦了,因为不管玛丽安还在如何痴心妄想,她埃丽诺总不能把这种行径归咎于什么误解和误会吧。唯一的解释是他完全变了心。埃丽诺若不是亲眼见到他那副窘态,她还要更加义愤填膺。那副窘态仿佛表明他知道自己做了错事,使她不愿相信他会那么品行不端竟然从一开始就心怀叵测,一直在玩弄她妹妹的感情。不在一起可能削弱了他的感情,而贪图物质享受可能使他彻底抛弃了这种感情,但是他以前确实爱过玛丽安,这无论加何无可置疑。

As for Marianne, on the pangs which so unhappy a meeting must alreadyhave given her, and on those still more severe which might await her inits probable consequence, she could not reflect without the deepestconcern. Her own situation gained in the comparison; for while shecould ESTEEM Edward as much as ever, however they might be divided infuture, her mind might be always supported. But every circumstancethat could embitter such an evil seemed uniting to heighten the miseryof Marianne in a final separation from Willoughby--in an immediate andirreconcilable rupture with him.

  至于说到玛丽安,这次不幸的会面已经给她带来了极大的痛苦,以后的结局可能还会使她更加痛苦不堪。埃丽诺前思后想,不能不感到忧虑重重。相比之下,她自己的处境还算好的;因为她能一如既往地敬重爱德华,不管他们将来如何人分两地,她心里总有个精神依托。但是,可能招致不幸的种种现象似乎凑合到一起来了,正在加剧玛丽安的悲痛,与威洛比最终分离的悲痛。—一无可调和地与他马上决裂

Nothing occurred during the next three or four days, to make Elinorregret what she had done, in applying to her mother; for Willoughbyneither came nor wrote. They were engaged about the end of that timeto attend Lady Middleton to a party, from which Mrs. Jennings was keptaway by the indisposition of her youngest daughter; and for this party,Marianne, wholly dispirited, careless of her appearance, and seemingequally indifferent whether she went or staid, prepared, without onelook of hope or one expression of pleasure. She sat by thedrawing-room fire after tea, till the moment of Lady Middleton'sarrival, without once stirring from her seat, or altering her attitude,lost in her own thoughts, and insensible of her sister's presence; andwhen at last they were told that Lady Middleton waited for them at thedoor, she started as if she had forgotten that any one was expected.

They arrived in due time at the place of destination, and as soon asthe string of carriages before them would allow, alighted, ascended thestairs, heard their names announced from one landing-place to anotherin an audible voice, and entered a room splendidly lit up, quite fullof company, and insufferably hot. When they had paid their tribute ofpoliteness by curtsying to the lady of the house, they were permittedto mingle in the crowd, and take their share of the heat andinconvenience, to which their arrival must necessarily add. After sometime spent in saying little or doing less, Lady Middleton sat down toCassino, and as Marianne was not in spirits for moving about, she andElinor luckily succeeding to chairs, placed themselves at no greatdistance from the table.

They had not remained in this manner long, before Elinor perceivedWilloughby, standing within a few yards of them, in earnestconversation with a very fashionable looking young woman. She sooncaught his eye, and he immediately bowed, but without attempting tospeak to her, or to approach Marianne, though he could not but see her;and then continued his discourse with the same lady. Elinor turnedinvoluntarily to Marianne, to see whether it could be unobserved byher. At that moment she first perceived him, and her whole countenanceglowing with sudden delight, she would have moved towards himinstantly, had not her sister caught hold of her.

"Good heavens!" she exclaimed, "he is there--he is there--Oh! why doeshe not look at me? why cannot I speak to him?"

"Pray, pray be composed," cried Elinor, "and do not betray what youfeel to every body present. Perhaps he has not observed you yet."

This however was more than she could believe herself; and to becomposed at such a moment was not only beyond the reach of Marianne, itwas beyond her wish. She sat in an agony of impatience which affectedevery feature.

At last he turned round again, and regarded them both; she started up,and pronouncing his name in a tone of affection, held out her hand tohim. He approached, and addressing himself rather to Elinor thanMarianne, as if wishing to avoid her eye, and determined not to observeher attitude, inquired in a hurried manner after Mrs. Dashwood, andasked how long they had been in town. Elinor was robbed of allpresence of mind by such an address, and was unable to say a word. Butthe feelings of her sister were instantly expressed. Her face wascrimsoned over, and she exclaimed, in a voice of the greatest emotion,"Good God! Willoughby, what is the meaning of this? Have you notreceived my letters? Will you not shake hands with me?"

He could not then avoid it, but her touch seemed painful to him, and heheld her hand only for a moment. During all this time he was evidentlystruggling for composure. Elinor watched his countenance and saw itsexpression becoming more tranquil. After a moment's pause, he spokewith calmness.

"I did myself the honour of calling in Berkeley Street last Tuesday,and very much regretted that I was not fortunate enough to findyourselves and Mrs. Jennings at home. My card was not lost, I hope."

"But have you not received my notes?" cried Marianne in the wildestanxiety. "Here is some mistake I am sure--some dreadful mistake. Whatcan be the meaning of it? Tell me, Willoughby; for heaven's sake tellme, what is the matter?"

He made no reply; his complexion changed and all his embarrassmentreturned; but as if, on catching the eye of the young lady with whom hehad been previously talking, he felt the necessity of instant exertion,he recovered himself again, and after saying, "Yes, I had the pleasureof receiving the information of your arrival in town, which you were sogood as to send me," turned hastily away with a slight bow and joinedhis friend.

Marianne, now looking dreadfully white, and unable to stand, sunk intoher chair, and Elinor, expecting every moment to see her faint, triedto screen her from the observation of others, while reviving her withlavender water.

"Go to him, Elinor," she cried, as soon as she could speak, "and forcehim to come to me. Tell him I must see him again--must speak to himinstantly.-- I cannot rest--I shall not have a moment's peace till thisis explained--some dreadful misapprehension or other.-- Oh go to himthis moment."

"How can that be done? No, my dearest Marianne, you must wait. This isnot the place for explanations. Wait only till tomorrow."

With difficulty however could she prevent her from following himherself; and to persuade her to check her agitation, to wait, at least,with the appearance of composure, till she might speak to him with moreprivacy and more effect, was impossible; for Marianne continuedincessantly to give way in a low voice to the misery of her feelings,by exclamations of wretchedness. In a short time Elinor saw Willoughbyquit the room by the door towards the staircase, and telling Mariannethat he was gone, urged the impossibility of speaking to him again thatevening, as a fresh argument for her to be calm. She instantly beggedher sister would entreat Lady Middleton to take them home, as she wastoo miserable to stay a minute longer.

Lady Middleton, though in the middle of a rubber, on being informedthat Marianne was unwell, was too polite to object for a moment to herwish of going away, and making over her cards to a friend, theydeparted as soon the carriage could be found. Scarcely a word wasspoken during their return to Berkeley Street. Marianne was in asilent agony, too much oppressed even for tears; but as Mrs. Jenningswas luckily not come home, they could go directly to their own room,where hartshorn restored her a little to herself. She was soonundressed and in bed, and as she seemed desirous of being alone, hersister then left her, and while she waited the return of Mrs. Jennings,had leisure enough for thinking over the past.

That some kind of engagement had subsisted between Willoughby andMarianne she could not doubt, and that Willoughby was weary of it,seemed equally clear; for however Marianne might still feed her ownwishes, SHE could not attribute such behaviour to mistake ormisapprehension of any kind. Nothing but a thorough change ofsentiment could account for it. Her indignation would have been stillstronger than it was, had she not witnessed that embarrassment whichseemed to speak a consciousness of his own misconduct, and preventedher from believing him so unprincipled as to have been sporting withthe affections of her sister from the first, without any design thatwould bear investigation. Absence might have weakened his regard, andconvenience might have determined him to overcome it, but that such aregard had formerly existed she could not bring herself to doubt.

As for Marianne, on the pangs which so unhappy a meeting must alreadyhave given her, and on those still more severe which might await her inits probable consequence, she could not reflect without the deepestconcern. Her own situation gained in the comparison; for while shecould ESTEEM Edward as much as ever, however they might be divided infuture, her mind might be always supported. But every circumstancethat could embitter such an evil seemed uniting to heighten the miseryof Marianne in a final separation from Willoughby--in an immediate andirreconcilable rupture with him.