Sense and Sensibility  理智与情感

Mrs. Dashwood had been informed by her husband of the solemn promise on the part of his son in their favour, which gave comfort to his last earthly reflections. She doubted the sincerity of this assurance no more than he had doubted it himself, and she thought of it for her daughters' sake with satisfaction, though as for herself she was persuaded that a much smaller provision than 7000L would support her in affluence. For their brother's sake, too, for the sake of his own heart, she rejoiced; and she reproached herself for being unjust to his merit before, in believing him incapable of generosity. His attentive behaviour to herself and his sisters convinced her that their welfare was dear to him, and, for a long time, she firmly relied on the liberality of his intentions.

  达什伍德太太听丈夫说过,他儿子郑重其事地答应关照她们母女几个。丈夫临终前听到这番许诺,死也暝目了。她和丈夫一样,对儿子的诚意深信不疑。虽然她觉得自己别说七千镑,即使再少得多,也能过得绰绰有余,但她一想起来就为女儿们感到高兴。再看那做哥哥的心眼这么好,她也为他感到高兴。她责怪自己以前不该错怪他,认为他一毛不拔。他这样对待继母和妹妹们,足以说明他多么关心她们的幸福。有好长一段时间,她对他的慷慨豁达坚信不疑。

The contempt which she had, very early in their acquaintance, felt for her daughter-in-law, was very much increased by the farther knowledge of her character, which half a year's residence in her family afforded; and perhaps in spite of every consideration of politeness or maternal affection on the side of the former, the two ladies might have found it impossible to have lived together so long, had not a particular circumstance occurred to give still greater eligibility, according to the opinions of Mrs. Dashwood, to her daughters' continuance at Norland.

  她和儿媳刚认识,就瞧不起她,如今在她家里住上半年,进一步了解了她的为人,不觉对她更加鄙视。尽管当婆母的以母爱为重,处处注意礼貌,若不是出现了一个特殊情况,婆媳俩也许还共处不了这么长时间呢。照达什伍德太太的看法,出了这件事,她的女儿们理所当然是要继续呆在诺兰庄园的。

This circumstance was a growing attachment between her eldest girl and the brother of Mrs. John Dashwood, a gentleman-like and pleasing young man, who was introduced to their acquaintance soon after his sister's establishment at Norland, and who had since spent the greatest part of his time there.

  这桩事就出在她大女儿和约翰。达什伍德夫人的弟弟之间,两人渐渐萌发了爱慕之情。那位弟弟是个很有绅士派头的逗人喜爱的年轻人,他姐姐住进诺兰庄园不久,就介绍他与她们母女结识了。从那以后,他将大部分时间都消磨在那里。

Some mothers might have encouraged the intimacy from motives of interest, for Edward Ferrars was the eldest son of a man who had died very rich; and some might have repressed it from motives of prudence, for, except a trifling sum, the whole of his fortune depended on the will of his mother. But Mrs. Dashwood was alike uninfluenced by either consideration. It was enough for her that he appeared to be amiable, that he loved her daughter, and that Elinor returned the partiality. It was contrary to every doctrine of hers that difference of fortune should keep any couple asunder who were attracted by resemblance of disposition; and that Elinor's merit should not be acknowledged by every one who knew her, was to her comprehension impossible.

  有些做母亲的从利害关系出发,或许会进一步撮合这种密切的感情,因为爱德华。费拉斯乃是一位已故财主的长子;不过,有些做母亲的为了慎重起见,也许还会遏制这种感情,因为爱德华除了一笔微不足道的资产之外,他的整个家产将取决于母亲的遗嘱。可是达什伍德太太对这两种情况都不予考虑。对她来说,只要爱德华看上去和蔼可亲,对她女儿一片钟情,而埃丽诺反过来又钟情于他,那就足够了。因为财产不等而拆散一对志趣相投的恋人,这与她的伦理观念是格格不入的。埃丽诺的优点竟然不被所有认识她的人所公认,简直叫她不可思议。

Edward Ferrars was not recommended to their good opinion by any peculiar graces of person or address. He was not handsome, and his manners required intimacy to make them pleasing. He was too diffident to do justice to himself; but when his natural shyness was overcome, his behaviour gave every indication of an open, affectionate heart. His understanding was good, and his education had given it solid improvement. But he was neither fitted by abilities nor disposition to answer the wishes of his mother and sister, who longed to see him distinguished--as--they hardly knew what. They wanted him to make a fine figure in the world in some manner or other. His mother wished to interest him in political concerns, to get him into parliament, or to see him connected with some of the great men of the day. Mrs. John Dashwood wished it likewise; but in the mean while, till one of these superior blessings could be attained, it would have quieted her ambition to see him driving a barouche. But Edward had no turn for great men or barouches. All his wishes centered in domestic comfort and the quiet of private life. Fortunately he had a younger brother who was more promising.

  她们之所以赏识爱德华。费拉斯,倒不是因为他人品出众,风度翩翩,他并不漂亮,那副仪态嘛,只有和他熟悉了才觉得逗人喜爱。他过于腼腆,这就使他越发不能显现本色了。不过,一旦消除了这种天生的羞怯,他的一举一动都表明他胸怀坦率,待人亲切。他头脑机灵,受教育后就更加聪明。但是,无论从才智还是从意向上看,他都不能使他母亲和姐姐称心如意,她们期望看到他出人头地-比如当个-她们也说不上当个啥。她们想让他在世界上出出这样或那样的风头。他母亲希望他对政治发生兴趣,以便能跻身于议会,或者结攀一些当今的大人物。约翰,达什伍德夫人抱有同样的愿望,不过,在这崇高理想实现之前,能先看到弟弟驾着一辆四轮马车,她也就会心满意足了。谁想,爱德华偏偏不稀罕大人物和四轮马车,他一心追求的是家庭的乐趣和生活的安逸。幸运的是,他有个弟弟比他有出息。

Edward had been staying several weeks in the house before he engaged much of Mrs. Dashwood's attention; for she was, at that time, in such affliction as rendered her careless of surrounding objects. She saw only that he was quiet and unobtrusive, and she liked him for it. He did not disturb the wretchedness of her mind by ill-timed conversation. She was first called to observe and approve him farther, by a reflection which Elinor chanced one day to make on the difference between him and his sister. It was a contrast which recommended him most forcibly to her mother.

  爱德华在姐姐家盘桓了几个星期,才引起达什伍德太太的注意;因为她当初太悲痛,对周围的事情也就不注意了。她只是看他不声不响,小心翼翼,为此对他发生了好感。他从来不用不合时宜的谈话,去扰乱她痛苦的心灵。她对他的进一步观察和赞许,最早是由埃丽诺偶然说出的一句话引起来的。那天,埃丽诺说他和他姐姐大不一样。这个对比很有说服力,帮他博得了她母亲的欢心。

"It is enough," said she; "to say that he is unlike Fanny is enough. It implies everything amiable. I love him already."

  “只要说他不像范妮,这就足够了,”她说,“这就是说他为人厚道,处处可亲。我已经喜爱上他了。”

"I think you will like him," said Elinor, "when you know more of him."

  “我想,”埃丽诺说,“你要是对他了解多了,准会喜欢他的。”

"Like him!" replied her mother with a smile. "I feel no sentiment of approbation inferior to love."

  “喜欢他!”母亲笑吟吟地答道。“我心里一满意,少不了要喜爱他。”

"You may esteem him."

  “你会器重他的。”

"I have never yet known what it was to separate esteem and love."

  “我还不知道怎么好把器重和喜爱分离开呢。”

Mrs. Dashwood now took pains to get acquainted with him. Her manners were attaching, and soon banished his reserve. She speedily comprehended all his merits; the persuasion of his regard for Elinor perhaps assisted her penetration; but she really felt assured of his worth: and even that quietness of manner, which militated against all her established ideas of what a young man's address ought to be, was no longer uninteresting when she knew his heart to be warm and his temper affectionate.

  随后,达什伍德太太便想方设法去接近爱德华。她态度和蔼,立即使他不再拘谨,很快便摸清了他的全部优点。她深信爱德华有意于埃丽诺,也许正是因此,她才有这么敏锐的眼力。不过,她确信他品德高尚。就连他那文静的举止,本是同她对青年人的既定的看法相抵触的,可是一旦了解到他待人热诚,性情温柔,也不再觉得令人厌烦了。

No sooner did she perceive any symptom of love in his behaviour to Elinor, than she considered their serious attachment as certain, and looked forward to their marriage as rapidly approaching.

  她一察觉爱德华对埃丽诺有点爱慕的表示,便认准他们是在真心相爱,巴望着他们很快就会结婚。

"In a few months, my dear Marianne." said she, "Elinor will, in all probability be settled for life. We shall miss her; but SHE will be happy."

  “亲爱的玛丽安,”她说,“再过几个月,埃丽诺十有八九要定下终身大事了。我们会惦记她的,不过她会很幸福。”

"Oh! Mama, how shall we do without her?"

  “啊,妈妈,要是离开她,我们可怎么办啊?”

"My love, it will be scarcely a separation. We shall live within a few miles of each other, and shall meet every day of our lives. You will gain a brother, a real, affectionate brother. I have the highest opinion in the world of Edward's heart. But you look grave, Marianne; do you disapprove your sister's choice?"

  “我的宝贝,这还算不上分离。我们和她就隔着几英里路远,天天都能见面。你会得到一个兄长,一个真正的、情同手足的兄长。我对爱德华的那颗心算是佩服到家了。不过,玛丽安,你板着个脸,难道你不赞成你姐姐的选择?”

"Perhaps," said Marianne, "I may consider it with some surprise. Edward is very amiable, and I love him tenderly. But yet--he is not the kind of young man--there is something wanting--his figure is not striking; it has none of that grace which I should expect in the man who could seriously attach my sister. His eyes want all that spirit, that fire, which at once announce virtue and intelligence. And besides all this, I am afraid, Mama, he has no real taste. Music seems scarcely to attract him, and though he admires Elinor's drawings very much, it is not the admiration of a person who can understand their worth. It is evident, in spite of his frequent attention to her while she draws, that in fact he knows nothing of the matter. He admires as a lover, not as a connoisseur. To satisfy me, those characters must be united. I could not be happy with a man whose taste did not in every point coincide with my own. He must enter into all my feelings; the same books, the same music must charm us both. Oh! mama, how spiritless, how tame was Edward's manner in reading to us last night! I felt for my sister most severely. Yet she bore it with so much composure, she seemed scarcely to notice it. I could hardly keep my seat. To hear those beautiful lines which have frequently almost driven me wild, pronounced with such impenetrable calmness, such dreadful indifference!"-- "He would certainly have done more justice to simple and elegant prose. I thought so at the time; but you WOULD give him Cowper."

  “也许是吧,”玛丽安说,“我感到有点意外。爱德华非常和蔼可亲,我也很喜爱他。但是,他可不是那种年轻人——他缺少点什么东西,他那副形象可不引人注目——我觉得,可以真正吸引我姐姐的那种魅力,他连一丝一毫都不具备。他两眼无神,缺乏生气,显不出美德与才华。除此之外,他恐怕还没有真正的爱好。音乐对他几乎没有吸引力,他虽然十分赞赏埃丽诺的绘画,可那不是内行人的赞赏。埃丽诺画画的时候,他总要凑到跟前,尽管如此,他对绘画显然一窍不通。他那是有情人的赞赏,而不是行家的赞赏。使我满意的人,必须同时具备这两种气质。跟一个趣味与我不能完全相投的人一起生活,我是不会幸福的。他必须与我情投意含;我们必须醉心于一样的书,一样的音乐。哦,妈妈!爱德华昨天夜里给我们朗读时,样子无精打采的,蹩脚透了!我真替姐姐担心。可她倒沉得住气,就像是没看见似的。我简直坐不住了,那么优美的诗句,常常使我激动得发狂,可是让他那么平淡无味、不动声色地一朗读,谁还听得下去!”

"Nay, Mama, if he is not to be animated by Cowper!--but we must allow for difference of taste. Elinor has not my feelings, and therefore she may overlook it, and be happy with him. But it would have broke MY heart, had I loved him, to hear him read with so little sensibility. Mama, the more I know of the world, the more am I convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much! He must have all Edward's virtues, and his person and manners must ornament his goodness with every possible charm."

  “他一定善于朗读质朴风雅的散文。我当时就这么想的,可你偏要让他念考柏的诗。”

"Remember, my love, that you are not seventeen. It is yet too early in life to despair of such a happiness. Why should you be less fortunate than your mother? In one circumstance only, my Marianne, may your destiny be different from hers!"

  “得了吧,妈妈,要是考柏的诗都打动不了他,那他还配读什么!——不过,我们必须承认趣味上的差异。埃丽诺没有我这样的情趣,因此她可以无视这种缺欠,跟他在一起还觉得挺幸福的。可是,我要是爱他的话,见他那样索然乏味地念书,我的心都要碎成八瓣了。妈妈,我世面见得越多,越觉得我一辈子也见不到一个我会真心爱恋的男人。我的要求太高了!他必须具备爱德华的全部美德。而为美德增添光彩,他又必须人品出众,风度迷人。”

Mrs. Dashwood remained at Norland several months; not from any disinclination to move when the sight of every well known spot ceased to raise the violent emotion which it produced for a while; for when her spirits began to revive, and her mind became capable of some other exertion than that of heightening its affliction by melancholy remembrances, she was impatient to be gone, and indefatigable in her inquiries for a suitable dwelling in the neighbourhood of Norland; for to remove far from that beloved spot was impossible. But she could hear of no situation that at once answered her notions of comfort and ease, and suited the prudence of her eldest daughter, whose steadier judgment rejected several houses as too large for their income, which her mother would have approved.

  “别忘了,我的宝贝,你还不到十七岁,对幸福丧失信心还为时过早。你怎么会不及你母亲幸运呢?玛丽安,你的命运与我的命运只会有一点是不同的!”

Mrs. Dashwood had been informed by her husband of the solemn promise on the part of his son in their favour, which gave comfort to his last earthly reflections. She doubted the sincerity of this assurance no more than he had doubted it himself, and she thought of it for her daughters' sake with satisfaction, though as for herself she was persuaded that a much smaller provision than 7000L would support her in affluence. For their brother's sake, too, for the sake of his own heart, she rejoiced; and she reproached herself for being unjust to his merit before, in believing him incapable of generosity. His attentive behaviour to herself and his sisters convinced her that their welfare was dear to him, and, for a long time, she firmly relied on the liberality of his intentions.

The contempt which she had, very early in their acquaintance, felt for her daughter-in-law, was very much increased by the farther knowledge of her character, which half a year's residence in her family afforded; and perhaps in spite of every consideration of politeness or maternal affection on the side of the former, the two ladies might have found it impossible to have lived together so long, had not a particular circumstance occurred to give still greater eligibility, according to the opinions of Mrs. Dashwood, to her daughters' continuance at Norland.

This circumstance was a growing attachment between her eldest girl and the brother of Mrs. John Dashwood, a gentleman-like and pleasing young man, who was introduced to their acquaintance soon after his sister's establishment at Norland, and who had since spent the greatest part of his time there.

Some mothers might have encouraged the intimacy from motives of interest, for Edward Ferrars was the eldest son of a man who had died very rich; and some might have repressed it from motives of prudence, for, except a trifling sum, the whole of his fortune depended on the will of his mother. But Mrs. Dashwood was alike uninfluenced by either consideration. It was enough for her that he appeared to be amiable, that he loved her daughter, and that Elinor returned the partiality. It was contrary to every doctrine of hers that difference of fortune should keep any couple asunder who were attracted by resemblance of disposition; and that Elinor's merit should not be acknowledged by every one who knew her, was to her comprehension impossible.

Edward Ferrars was not recommended to their good opinion by any peculiar graces of person or address. He was not handsome, and his manners required intimacy to make them pleasing. He was too diffident to do justice to himself; but when his natural shyness was overcome, his behaviour gave every indication of an open, affectionate heart. His understanding was good, and his education had given it solid improvement. But he was neither fitted by abilities nor disposition to answer the wishes of his mother and sister, who longed to see him distinguished--as--they hardly knew what. They wanted him to make a fine figure in the world in some manner or other. His mother wished to interest him in political concerns, to get him into parliament, or to see him connected with some of the great men of the day. Mrs. John Dashwood wished it likewise; but in the mean while, till one of these superior blessings could be attained, it would have quieted her ambition to see him driving a barouche. But Edward had no turn for great men or barouches. All his wishes centered in domestic comfort and the quiet of private life. Fortunately he had a younger brother who was more promising.

Edward had been staying several weeks in the house before he engaged much of Mrs. Dashwood's attention; for she was, at that time, in such affliction as rendered her careless of surrounding objects. She saw only that he was quiet and unobtrusive, and she liked him for it. He did not disturb the wretchedness of her mind by ill-timed conversation. She was first called to observe and approve him farther, by a reflection which Elinor chanced one day to make on the difference between him and his sister. It was a contrast which recommended him most forcibly to her mother.

"It is enough," said she; "to say that he is unlike Fanny is enough. It implies everything amiable. I love him already."

"I think you will like him," said Elinor, "when you know more of him."

"Like him!" replied her mother with a smile. "I feel no sentiment of approbation inferior to love."

"You may esteem him."

"I have never yet known what it was to separate esteem and love."

Mrs. Dashwood now took pains to get acquainted with him. Her manners were attaching, and soon banished his reserve. She speedily comprehended all his merits; the persuasion of his regard for Elinor perhaps assisted her penetration; but she really felt assured of his worth: and even that quietness of manner, which militated against all her established ideas of what a young man's address ought to be, was no longer uninteresting when she knew his heart to be warm and his temper affectionate.

No sooner did she perceive any symptom of love in his behaviour to Elinor, than she considered their serious attachment as certain, and looked forward to their marriage as rapidly approaching.

"In a few months, my dear Marianne." said she, "Elinor will, in all probability be settled for life. We shall miss her; but SHE will be happy."

"Oh! Mama, how shall we do without her?"

"My love, it will be scarcely a separation. We shall live within a few miles of each other, and shall meet every day of our lives. You will gain a brother, a real, affectionate brother. I have the highest opinion in the world of Edward's heart. But you look grave, Marianne; do you disapprove your sister's choice?"

"Perhaps," said Marianne, "I may consider it with some surprise. Edward is very amiable, and I love him tenderly. But yet--he is not the kind of young man--there is something wanting--his figure is not striking; it has none of that grace which I should expect in the man who could seriously attach my sister. His eyes want all that spirit, that fire, which at once announce virtue and intelligence. And besides all this, I am afraid, Mama, he has no real taste. Music seems scarcely to attract him, and though he admires Elinor's drawings very much, it is not the admiration of a person who can understand their worth. It is evident, in spite of his frequent attention to her while she draws, that in fact he knows nothing of the matter. He admires as a lover, not as a connoisseur. To satisfy me, those characters must be united. I could not be happy with a man whose taste did not in every point coincide with my own. He must enter into all my feelings; the same books, the same music must charm us both. Oh! mama, how spiritless, how tame was Edward's manner in reading to us last night! I felt for my sister most severely. Yet she bore it with so much composure, she seemed scarcely to notice it. I could hardly keep my seat. To hear those beautiful lines which have frequently almost driven me wild, pronounced with such impenetrable calmness, such dreadful indifference!"-- "He would certainly have done more justice to simple and elegant prose. I thought so at the time; but you WOULD give him Cowper."

"Nay, Mama, if he is not to be animated by Cowper!--but we must allow for difference of taste. Elinor has not my feelings, and therefore she may overlook it, and be happy with him. But it would have broke MY heart, had I loved him, to hear him read with so little sensibility. Mama, the more I know of the world, the more am I convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much! He must have all Edward's virtues, and his person and manners must ornament his goodness with every possible charm."

"Remember, my love, that you are not seventeen. It is yet too early in life to despair of such a happiness. Why should you be less fortunate than your mother? In one circumstance only, my Marianne, may your destiny be different from hers!"